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Geneticists welcome Kuwaiti decision to amend law on compulsory DNA collection

October 19, 2016

Responding to the decision of the Emir of Kuwait to request the Kuwaiti Prime Minister to reconsider the scope of the law that would have imposed compulsory DNA testing on all residents as well as visitors to the country, Professor Olaf Horst Rieß, President of the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG), said:"This is a wise and responsible decision. The law as originally proposed was disproportionate and likely to be ineffectual in tackling the problem of terrorism, and would have had negative consequences not just for Kuwaiti society, but also for medical science and research."

Background to the law and the ESHG position may be found here: https://www.eshg.org/13.0.html#c4745
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European Society of Human Genetics

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