Nav: Home

Developmental science research sheds new light on the origins of discrimination, social exclusion

October 19, 2016

Experiencing prejudice and discrimination in childhood can have long term consequences, including depression, poor academic performance and negative health outcomes. A new special section, published by the Society for Research in Child Development in the journal Child Development, titled "Discrimination, Social Exclusion, and Intergroup Attitudes: Equity and Justice in Developmental Science" highlights cutting edge research in developmental science regarding the origins and development of equity and justice. The special section discusses why equity and justice is central to the developmental science discipline and how it can inform policy and practice aimed at challenging inequality as well as mitigating the adverse experiences of marginalized people.

This special section, edited by Dr. Melanie Killen, Dr. Adam Rutland, and Dr. Tiffany Yip, begins with an affirmation that "the fair and equitable treatment of individuals has been a core value of humanity..." and an overview of previous research on children's development in light of this set of issues. It goes on to present novel research findings on children's experiences of discrimination, how discrimination impacts development, discrimination in schools and neighborhoods, and suggestions for future research directions for a variety of disciplines, including cognitive neuroscience and behavioral economics.

Highlights of the many new findings reported in the papers in the special section include that:
  • As they age adolescents judge race-based humor as more acceptable.

  • Children as young as 4 and 5 associate race with wealth status but also rectify social inequalities

  • Social exclusion activates the same brain regions as experiencing physical pain or harm.

  • Discrimination in middle school impacts developmental outcomes 2 years later

Journalists interested in speaking with any of the editors of the special section listed above or gaining access to the complete special section of Child Development should contact Hannah Klein.

SRCD was established in 1933 by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences. The Society's goals are to advance interdisciplinary research in child development and to encourage applications of research findings. Its membership of more than 5,700 scientists is representative of the various disciplines and professions that contribute to knowledge of child development.
-end-


Society for Research in Child Development

Related Discrimination Articles:

Young American Latinos report the most discrimination
Although the United States has seen a dramatic increase in Mexican and Latin American immigrants since 1970, a recent study by Penn State researchers is one of the few where perceived discrimination is examined in this population.
Physician moms are often subject to workplace discrimination
Of the nearly 6,000 physician mothers in the survey, nearly 78 percent reported discrimination of any type.
New tool reflects black men's experiences of police-based discrimination
Researchers have developed a new tool to catalog police and law enforcement interactions with black men, the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale, with the hope of documenting people's experiences and perceptions of police-based discrimination.
ASHG applauds passage of Canadian Genetic Non-Discrimination Act
The American Society of Human Genetics applauds yesterday's passage of S-201, the Genetic Non-Discrimination Act, in a 222-60 vote by the Parliament of Canada's House of Commons.
Perceived weight discrimination linked to physical inactivity
People who feel that they have been discriminated against because of their weight are much less likely to be physically active than people who don't perceive that they have suffered any such stigmatization, according to new research led by UCL.
Study: More customer information can help Airbnb address discrimination
New research by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor suggests that companies in the sharing economy can eliminate discrimination by encouraging clients to write reviews and by designing better ways to share information that signals guest quality.
AGS statement on discrimination
The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) opposes discrimination against healthcare professionals or older people based on race, color, religion, gender (including gender identity, sexual orientation, and pregnancy), disability, age, or national origin.
Losing sleep over discrimination? 'Everyday discrimination' may contribute to sleep problems
People who perceive more discrimination in daily life have higher rates of sleep problems, based on both subjective and objective measures, reports a study in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society.
Study shows discrimination interacts with genetics and impacts health
It's no secret that discrimination is stressful for those who experience it, but turns out the issue is more than skin deep -- these stressors can interact with our genetics to negatively impact our health, a new University of Florida study shows.
Researchers explore how physicians can handle discrimination by patients, families
As part of a study, more than a dozen physicians were asked how they would advise their trainees to respond to three scenarios of discrimination, as well as how they would respond themselves.

Related Discrimination Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...