Director of Emory Vaccine Center to give Wistar Institute's 1999 Tadeusz J. Wiktor Memorial lecture

October 19, 1999

WHO: Rafi Ahmed, PhD, Director and Professor,Emory Vaccine Center, Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta

WHAT: 1999 Tadeusz J. Wiktor Memorial Lecture, named for the former head of The Wistar Institute's rabies unit who developed the rabies vaccine used today. Dr. Ahmed's lecture is titled, "Immune Memory to Viruses."

WHEN: Wednesday, November 3, 1999, 4:00 pm.

WHERE:The Joseph N. Grossman, MD Auditorium
The Wistar Institute
3601 Spruce Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-4268

Dr. Ahmed received his PhD in Microbiology and Molecular Genetics from Harvard. He is currently director of the Emory Vaccine Center and a professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the Emory University School of Medicine. His research focuses on the immunology and pathogenesis of chronic viral infections.
-end-
The Wistar Institute, established in 1892, was the first independent medical research facility in the country. For more than 100 years, Wistar scientists have been making history and improving world health through their development of vaccines for diseases that include rabies, German measles, infantile gastroenteritis (rotavirus), and cytomegalovirus; discovery of molecules like interleukin-12, which are helping the immune system fight bacteria, parasites, viruses and cancer; and location of genes that contribute to the development of diseases like breast, lung and prostate cancer. Wistar is a National Cancer Institute Cancer Center.

The Wistar Institute

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