Neurosurgeons identify growth of new adult brain cells, possible treatment for epilepsy

October 20, 2004

SAN FRANCISCO - It had long been thought that once the human brain is fully matured, no new brain cells develop. Now a team of researchers and scientists has found evidence of cell generation in the brains of adults with epilepsy and say it could lead to ground-breaking treatment for the disease. William Bingaman, M.D., a neurosurgeon from the Cleveland Clinic, presented his findings at the 54th annual meeting of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

Researchers studied patients with medically intractable epilepsy who underwent epilepsy surgery to see if new cells were developing post-operatively. They found such cell generation and believe that may be the cause of the recurring seizures that are typical of epilepsy. Dr. Bingaman believes the discovery of this cell generation may provide a target for future treatment and prevention of epilepsy.

The Congress of Neurological Surgeons meeting, which is being held jointly this year with the Italian Society of Neurosurgeons, features dozens of seminars and courses led by world leaders in neurosurgery. It is being held at the Moscone West Convention Center through Thursday. The annual meeting provides continuing medical education for practicing neurosurgeons, neurosurgical residents in training, and post-graduate neurosurgical fellows, as well as allied health professionals, including nurses, physician assistants and clinical specialists.

This education is provided through lectures, courses demonstrating neurosurgical techniques, exhibits about the newest instruments and technology in the neurosurgical community, and examples of clinical and laboratory advances in neurological surgery.
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Contact: Edie E. Zusman, M.D.
James Chandler, M.D.
415-348-4528
916-804-4227

About the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

The Congress of Neurological Surgeons exists for the purpose of promoting the public welfare through the advancement of neurosurgery, by a commitment to excellence in education, and by dedication to research and scientific knowledge. The Congress of Neurological Surgeons maintains the vitality of our learned profession through the altruistic volunteer efforts of the members and the development of leadership in service to the public, to their colleagues in other disciplines, and to the special needs of their fellow neurosurgeons throughout the world and at every stage of their professional lives. Twenty-two surgeons held the founding meeting of the Congress in St. Louis on May 11, 1951. The first Annual Meeting of the Congress was held in November 1951, in Memphis, Tenn. Total membership at that meeting was 121. Currently, over 5,000 neurosurgeons are members worldwide. To register or for more information about the 54th annual meeting, please visit: http://www.neurosurgeon.org/

Congress of Neurological Surgeons

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