Neurosurgeons looking at stem cells from skin to fight brain tumors

October 20, 2004

SAN FRANCISCO - A team of neurosurgeons and scientists from Italy is looking into whether stem cells derived from a brain tumor patient's own skin can be used to fight the tumors. The researchers successfully grew stem cells from skin samples of adult patients with brain tumors. It is hoped that these cells can then be used as a new brain tumor therapy, which has been attempted successfully in mice. The Italian neurosurgeons made a presentation about their new study at the 54th annual meeting of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, which is being held jointly this year with the Italian Society of Neurosurgeons. The meeting, featuring dozens of seminars and courses led by world leaders in neurosurgery, is being held at the Moscone West Convention Center through Thursday.

Researchers found that mice with brain tumors that were treated with stem cells showed both increased blood supply and decreased tumor growth into the surrounding brain. These mice also lived on average 50 percent longer than mice that weren't given this therapy.

The annual meeting provides continuing medical education for practicing neurosurgeons, neurosurgical residents in training, and post-graduate neurosurgical fellows, as well as allied health professionals, including nurses, physician assistants and clinical specialists. This education is provided through lectures, courses demonstrating neurosurgical techniques, exhibits about the newest instruments and technology in the neurosurgical community, and examples of clinical and laboratory advances in neurological surgery.
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About the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

The Congress of Neurological Surgeons exists for the purpose of promoting the public welfare through the advancement of neurosurgery, by a commitment to excellence in education, and by dedication to research and scientific knowledge. The Congress of Neurological Surgeons maintains the vitality of our learned profession through the altruistic volunteer efforts of the members and the development of leadership in service to the public, to their colleagues in other disciplines, and to the special needs of their fellow neurosurgeons throughout the world and at every stage of their professional lives. Twenty-two surgeons held the founding meeting of the Congress in St. Louis on May 11, 1951. The first Annual Meeting of the Congress was held in November 1951, in Memphis, Tenn. Total membership at that meeting was 121. Currently, over 5,000 neurosurgeons are members worldwide. To register or for more information about the 54th annual meeting, please visit: http://www.neurosurgery.org/cns/meetings/2002/index.html

Congress of Neurological Surgeons

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