Sirolimus-eluting Coronary Stent outperforms paclitaxel eluting stent in seven study meta-analysis

October 20, 2005

WASHINGTON, D.C. - (October 20, 2005) - The most comprehensive and detailed analysis conducted to date of drug-eluting stent comparative trials shows a marked difference in the rate of target lesion revascularization (TLR) and restenosis in patients who received the CYPHER® Stent vs. the Taxus Stent in seven studies totaling 4,214 patients. The CYPHER® Stent vs. Taxus Stent meta-analysis was presented today to cardiologists and other attendees from throughout the world during the Cardiovascular Research Foundation's (CRF) 17th Annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium.

The purpose of this meta-analysis was to systematically review randomized comparative DES trials and obtain a more precise understanding of the true treatment effect of the CYPHER® Stent and the Taxus Stent than any individual trial can provide.

Stephan Winndecker, M.D. and Peter Juni, M.D. of University Hospital Bern in Switzerland conducted a thorough review of clinical results from the head-to-head trials, analyzed extended patient follow-up data and initiated an extensive review of publications and information on these trials, many of which have been published in major medical journals.

The meta-analysis of the seven head-to-head drug-eluting stent trials - TAXI, SIRTAX, ISAR DESIRE, ISAR DIABETES, REALITY, CORPAL and BASKET - demonstrated that the CYPHER® Stent more effectively reduced the need for re-treatment, target lesion revascularization, by about 30% compared to Taxus Stent-treated patients.

"The benefit of the CYPHER® Stent in reducing the need for re-treatment was observed in multiple patient and lesion types in this analysis," stated Dennis Donohoe, M.D., vice president of worldwide clinical research and regulatory affairs for Cordis Corporation. "This rigorously conducted meta analysis establishes the highest level of scientific evidence of the relative performance of these two drug-eluting stents. The CYPHER® Stent's strong clinical performance across these trials is clearly demonstrated and will be of great value to physicians and patients.

The data from the seven trials studied in this analysis have been previously presented in medical congresses or published in journals:
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About the CYPHER® Stent
The CYPHER® Stent has been chosen by cardiologists worldwide to treat more than 1.5 million patients with coronary artery disease. The safety and efficacy of the device is supported by a robust clinical trial program that includes more than 40 studies, inclusive of independent clinical trials, that examine the performance of the CYPHER® Stent in a broad range of patients. Developed and manufactured by Cordis Corporation, the CYPHER® Stent is currently available in more than 80 countries and has the longest-term clinical follow-up of any drug-eluting stent. The CYPHER SELECTTM Sirolimus-eluting Coronary Stent, which is the first next generation drug-eluting stent, was launched in Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America and Canada in 2003. More information about the CYPHER® Stent can be found at www.cypherusa.com.

About Cordis Corporation
Cordis Corporation, a Johnson & Johnson company, is a worldwide leader in developing and manufacturing interventional vascular technology. Through the company's innovation, research and development, physicians worldwide are better able to treat the millions of patients who suffer from vascular disease.

*Cordis Corporation has entered into an exclusive worldwide license with Wyeth for the localized delivery of sirolimus in certain fields of use, including delivery via vascular stenting. Sirolimus, the active drug released for the stent, is marketed by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, a division of Wyeth, under the name Rapamune®. Rapamune is a trademark of Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.

The third-party trademarks used herein are trademarks of their respective owners.

Edelman Public Relations

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