Virtual colonoscopy option could improve colorectal cancer screening rates, patient survey suggests

October 21, 2010

Providing computed tomography colonography (CTC) -- otherwise known as virtual colonoscopy -- as an alternative to conventional colonoscopy could improve colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates, according to a study in the November issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (www.ajronline.org).

CRC is the second leading cause of cancer in the U.S. "While colonoscopy is currently the preferred test for CRC screening, the invasive and time-consuming characteristics of the test are often cited as reasons for noncompliance with screening," said Fouad J. Moawad, lead author of the study and physician at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Bethesda, MD.

The study, performed at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, MD, included 250 consecutive average-risk patients undergoing CRC screening who completed a survey that assessed reasons for choosing CTC in lieu of colonoscopy, compliance with CRC screening if CTC was not offered and which of the two tests they preferred.

"Had CTC not been an available option, 91 of the 250 patients would have foregone CRC screening. Among the 57 patients who had experienced both procedures, 95 percent preferred CTC," said Moawad. The most common reasons for undergoing CTC included convenience (33.6 percent), recommendation by referring provider (13.2 percent) and perceived safety (10.8 percent).

"It is recognized that screening reduces CRC incidence and mortality. Despite this widely acknowledged benefit, patient adherence to screening guidelines remains suboptimal," said Moawad.

"Our findings show the importance of providing CTC as an alternative screening option for CRC at our institution, which may increase CRC adherence screening rates," he said.
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This study appears in the November issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology. For a copy of the full study or to request an interview with the lead author, please contact Heather Curry via email at hcurry@acr-arrs.org or 703-390-9822.

About ARRS

The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) was founded in 1900 and is the oldest radiology society in the United States. Its monthly journal, the American Journal of Roentgenology, began publication in 1906. Radiologists from all over the world attend the ARRS annual meeting to participate in instructional courses, scientific paper presentations and scientific and commercial exhibits related to the field of radiology. The Society is named after the first Nobel Laureate in Physics, Wilhelm Röentgen, who discovered the x-ray in 1895.

American College of Radiology

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