Infant pertussis hospitalizations lower than expected after teen vaccinations

October 21, 2013

Widespread vaccination of adolescents for pertussis was associated with lower rates of infant hospitalizations for the respiratory infection than would have been expected had teens not been inoculated according to new research in Pediatrics.

Reporting their results online Oct. 21, researchers said the study underscores the importance of increasing vaccination rates among teens and adults to stem an ongoing pertussis epidemic among infants. The research was conducted by physicians at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the University of Michigan.

The ongoing epidemic has been linked to waning immunity and the failure to vaccinate, according to Katherine A. Auger, MD, MSc, the study's lead author and a pediatrician in Division of Hospital Medicine at Cincinnati Children's.

"We know infants get pertussis from family members, including older siblings," Auger said. "While it is encouraging to find a modest reduction in infant hospitalizations after the vaccination of adolescents began, there were still more than 1,000 infants hospitalized for pertussis in 2011. Expecting parents should discuss with their doctors the need for vaccination of all caregivers before the birth of a baby."

The current study was initiated following recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control in 2006 to vaccinate all adolescents against pertussis. Researchers used data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a database maintained by the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Investigators examined pertussis hospitalization rates for infants after the new adolescent vaccine recommendations were made and compared them to predicted hospitalization rates had adolescent vaccinations not been implemented. Hospitalization data from 2000 to 2005 - prior to the teen vaccination recommendations - were used to predict hospitalization rates had adolescent vaccinations not been implemented.

In three of the four years examined after the teen vaccination recommendations (2008-2011), investigators found lower hospitalization rates for infants than would have been expected with no adolescent vaccinations.

In 2011 for example, the expected hospitalization rate for pertussis if adolescent vaccinations had not been implemented was 12 hospitalizations per 10,000 infants. The observed rate following the teen vaccinations was significantly lower at 3.27 hospitalizations per 10,000 infants.

Pregnant women should receive pertussis vaccination during pregnancy, according to a recommendation made by the Centers for Disease Control in 2012. Auger said future research will be needed to assess how and if this policy change further affects pertussis hospitalization rates in infants.
-end-
Study authors received funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation through the Clinical Scholars program.

About Cincinnati Children's:

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center ranks third in the nation among all Honor Roll hospitals in U.S. News and World Report's 2012 Best Children's Hospitals ranking. It is ranked #1 for neonatology and in the top 10 for all pediatric specialties. Cincinnati Children's, a non-profit organization is one of the top three recipients of pediatric research grants from the National Institutes of Health and a research affiliate of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. It is internationally recognized for improving child health and transforming delivery of care through fully integrated, globally recognized research, education and innovation. Additional information can be found at http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org.

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Related Vaccination Articles from Brightsurf:

US adults' likelihood of accepting COVID-19 vaccination
In this survey study of U.S. adults, vaccine-related attributes and political characteristics were associated with self-reported preferences for choosing a hypothetical COVID-19 vaccine and self- reported willingness to receive vaccination.

Vaccination insights
While scientists race to develop and test a vaccine effective against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, recent studies have indicated that countries with widespread BCG vaccination appear to be weathering the pandemic better than their counterparts.

Wording of vaccination messages influences behavior
An experiment by Washington State University researchers revealed that relatively small differences in messages influenced people's attitudes about the human papillomavirus or HPV vaccine, which has been shown to help prevent cancer.

Addressing HPV vaccination concerns
Research from the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute finds a promising avenue for addressing vaccine hesitancy around HPV vaccine.

Virtual reality could help flu vaccination rates
Using a virtual reality simulation to show how flu spreads and its impact on others could be a way to encourage more people to get a flu vaccination, according to a study by researchers at the University of Georgia and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

Religion associated with HPV vaccination rate for college women
A survey of female college students finds 25% had not been vaccinated for HPV and religion may be a contributing factor.

Measles vaccination: 'All for one and one for all'
A commentary by researchers addresses the specter of clinical, ethical, public health and legal concerns that have been raised because of the recent measles outbreaks in New York.

New single vaccination approach to killer diseases
Scientists from the University of Adelaide's Research Centre for Infectious Diseases have developed a single vaccination approach to simultaneously combat influenza and pneumococcal infections, the world's most deadly respiratory diseases.

Vaccination may help protect bats from deadly disease
A new study shows that vaccination may reduce the impact of white-nose syndrome in bats, marking a milestone in the international fight against one of the most destructive wildlife diseases in modern times.

Parents reassured febrile seizures following vaccination not dangerous
New University of Sydney research finds that febrile seizures after vaccination are rare, not serious and are no different to febrile seizures due to other causes such as from a virus.

Read More: Vaccination News and Vaccination Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.