Nav: Home

Interventions to improve water qulaity for preventing diarrhea

October 21, 2015

Researchers from Emory University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the World Health Organization have carried out an updated Cochrane review to assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve water quality for preventing diarrhoea.

Contaminated water is a major cause of diarrhoea worldwide, especially among young children in low- and middle-income countries. In these settings, water often has to be collected from open rivers or streams, sometimes carried long distances, and frequently stored in open containers.

While reliable, piped-in supplies of clean water are undoubtedly the preferred option, the review authors found no trials assessing this, and only very few trials assessing improvements in the water source such as wells, bore holes, or harvested rain water.

However, the review authors included 47 trials, enrolling more than 72,000 participants, assessing interventions to improve the quality of drinking water in peoples' homes.

"These interventions that address the microbial contamination of water at the point-of-use can be important interim measures to improve drinking water quality," said Professor Thomas Clasen from Emory University, the lead author of the review, "especially as re-contamination often occurs during use in the home, even where the source water is relatively safe".

The review authors found that interventions of distributing chlorine products or sachets of disinfectant to people's homes, to be added to stored water, may reduce diarrhoea episodes by about a quarter, and water filtration at home using various types of filtration systems probably reduces diarrhoea by around a half. They also found some evidence that even very low-tech solutions, such as leaving bottled water in direct sunlight for six hours, may have important protective effects.

"The evidence suggests that the more people use these interventions, the greater the benefits," added Professor Clasen, "so we also need research into practical approaches to increase the coverage and long-term use of these interventions, particularly among the most vulnerable populations".
-end-
The Cochrane review was co-ordinated by the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG), based at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. The CIDG has been in operation since 1994, led by Professor Paul Garner, and is supported by over 600 authors from 52 countries.

Read the updated review here.

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Related Drinking Water Articles:

Natural contaminant threat to drinking water from groundwater
Climate change and urbanisation are set to threaten groundwater drinking water quality, new research from UNSW Sydney shows.
Fresh clean drinking water for all could soon to be a reality in Pakistan
A fresh, clean water supply will be a reality in Pakistan, particularly in South Punjab, following the announcement of an international partnership spearheaded by the Pakistan government, alongside other key stakeholders, and driven by the University of Huddersfield.
Keeping lead out of drinking water when switching disinfectants
Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St.
Solar power with a free side of drinking water
An integrated system seamlessly harnesses sunlight to cogenerate electricity and fresh water.
'Liquid forensics' could lead to safer drinking water
Ping! The popular 1990 film, The Hunt for Red October, helped introduce sonar technology on submarines to pop culture.
Progress in hunt for unknown compounds in drinking water
When we drink a glass of water, we ingest an unknown amount of by-products that are formed in the treatment process.
Arsenic in drinking water may change heart structure
Among young adults, drinking water contaminated with arsenic may lead to structural changes in the heart that raise their risk of heart disease.
Not drinking water associated with consuming more calories from sugary drinks
This study examined how drinking water was associated with the amount of calories children, adolescents and young adults consume from sugar-sweetened beverages, including sodas, fruit drinks and sports drinks.
Not drinking water may boost kids' consumption of sugary beverages
Kids and young adults who drink no water throughout the day may consume twice the amount of calories from sugary drinks than those who drink water, according to Penn State researchers.
Drinking water sucked from the dusty desert air
An inexpensive hydrogel-based material efficiently captures moisture even from low-humidity air and then releases it on demand.
More Drinking Water News and Drinking Water Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Clint Smith
The killing of George Floyd by a police officer has sparked massive protests nationwide. This hour, writer and scholar Clint Smith reflects on this moment, through conversation, letters, and poetry.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Nina
Producer Tracie Hunte stumbled into a duet between Nina Simone and the sounds of protest outside her apartment. Then she discovered a performance by Nina on April 7, 1968 - three days after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Tracie talks about what Nina's music, born during another time when our country was facing questions that seemed to have no answer, meant then and why it still resonates today.  Listen to Nina's brother, Samuel Waymon, talk about that April 7th concert here.