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Cooking fuels contribute to childhood pneumonia in developing countries

October 21, 2016

Solid fuels used for cooking are the prevailing source of indoor pollution in developing countries. Now a worldwide ecological assessment has found that rates of pneumonia among young children in different countries are linked with the use of solid fuels.

The findings suggest that interventions aimed at increasing the use of efficient stoves will reduce indoor pollution and significantly improve the health of children around the globe.

"The harm to health is completely preventable by using improved stoves that cost about $30 each," said Dr. Roberto Accinelli, lead author of the Respirology study.
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Wiley

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