9 SAGE journals participate in global theme issue on poverty and human development

October 22, 2007

SAGE, the world's fifth largest journal publisher, is proud to be participating in a Global Theme Issue on Poverty and Human Development launched today by the Council of Science Editors.

The CSE global theme issue aims to raise awareness and stimulate interest and debate on the crucial matters of poverty and development internationally. Over 230 scientific journals from both developed and developing countries will simultaneously publish papers on this topic, enabling widespread access to the latest research and analysis.

Nine SAGE journals from its health sciences portfolio are participating by publishing editorials, one or more articles, or entire issues devoted to the theme of poverty and human development. The SAGE journals publishing content on the topic, along with each participating issue, are:Upon each issue's release, free online access to the Global Theme Issue content from the above-mentioned SAGE titles will be available for a limited time.

"With a growing list of over 150 journals in science, technology and medicine, SAGE is committed to providing the dissemination of scholarly research on a global scale," commented Alison Mudditt, Executive Vice President, SAGE. We commend the CSE for their role in coordinating this important initiative, and we along with our journal editors are excited to be taking part."
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For more information and links to each issue, visit www.sagepublications.com/GlobalThemeIssue.

SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology and medicine. An independent company, SAGE has principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore. www.sagepub.com

The Council of Science Editors is a professional organization with 1,200 members dedicated to promoting excellence in the communication of scientific information. It was established in 1957 by joint action of the National Science Foundation and the American Institute of Biological Sciences. Today, it enjoys close relationships with a number of scientific publishing organizations, both national and international, but it functions autonomously, relying on the vigor of its members to attain the goals of the organization. www.councilscienceeditors.org

A Global Theme Issue Event was held at the US National Institutes of Health on Monday, October 22, 10 AM-1 PM ET. During this event, research from some of the Global Theme Issue journals was presented examining interventions and projects to improve health and reduce inequities among the poor. Subject areas for this event included: childbirth safety, HIV/AIDS, malaria treatment, food insufficiency and sexual behavior, interventions to improve child survival, physician brain drain from the developing world, and influenza's impact on children. For more information on the meeting, please visit: http://www.fic.nih.gov/news/events/cse.htm . The event will be available via webcast streamed live at: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=6239 .

SAGE

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