Collegiate Inventors Competition recognizes top student inventors

October 22, 2008

Akron, Ohio (October 22, 2008) - The National Inventors Hall of Fame Foundation today announced the 2008 finalists of its Collegiate Inventors Competition. This year's group of finalists includes undergraduate and graduate students from across the country whose inventions show practical applications to meet pressing needs in our society. The Presenting Sponsors of the 2008 Collegiate Inventors Competition are the Abbott Fund, the philanthropic foundation of the global health care company Abbott, and the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

In celebration of Global Entrepreneurship Week (November 17 - 23), the twelve finalist teams, comprised of one to four students per team, will be hosted by the Kauffman Foundation at their headquarters in Kansas City, Missouri for the final round of judging and an Awards Ceremony on November 19, 2008. Prizes of $15,000 each will be awarded to the top undergraduate and graduate finalists, and the Grand Prize winner will receive $25,000. The academic advisors for each winning team will receive a cash prize as well.

Meet the 2008 finalists:
Undergraduates

Graduates

"This year's finalists are immersed in innovative, important work," said Jeffrey Dollinger, President of Invent Now, Inc., a subsidiary of the National Inventors Hall of Fame Foundation. "Once again, the Collegiate Inventors Competition has proven an effective showcase for the achievements of our nation's talented college students, and we're excited to follow their inventive work as they progress in their academic and professional careers."

The process for this year's Competition began when the National Inventors Hall of Fame Foundation solicited entries from over 2,000 campuses to identify top collegiate inventors. Each entry was judged on the originality of the idea, process, or technology, as well as its potential value and usefulness to society. This initial judging produced the group of finalists who will meet the final judging panel.

The prestigious group of judges includes seven inductees from the National Inventors Hall of Fame: Robert Bower (self-aligned gate MOSFET), Edith Flanigen (molecular sieves), Thomas Fogarty (balloon embolectomy catheter), Don Keck (optical fiber), William Murphy, Jr. (disposable medical trays and sealed blood bags), Rangaswamy Srinivasan (excimer laser surgery), and James West (electret microphone). In addition, the judging panel will include experts from Abbott and the USPTO.
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About the Collegiate Inventors Competition

The Collegiate Inventors Competition encourages college students to be active in science, engineering, mathematics, technology, and creative invention. The Competition specifically recognizes and rewards the innovations, discoveries, and research by college and university students and their advisors for projects leading to inventions that may have the potential of receiving patent protection. Introduced by the National Inventors Hall of Fame Foundation in 1990, the Competition has awarded more than $1 million to nearly 100 students for their innovative work and scientific achievement through the help of its sponsors. For more information on the Competition's sponsors, the Abbott Fund and the USPTO, visit www.abbottfund.org and www.uspto.gov. For more information on the Competition and past winners, visit www.invent.org/collegiate.

National Inventors Hall of Fame

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