Long-term treatment with proton pump inhibitor can increase weight

October 22, 2009

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common esophageal disorder, and frequently encountered in the primary care setting. Accumulating evidence has confirmed the excellent efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy in patients with all grades of GERD, making these agents the mainstay of treatment. However, the possible impact of changes in body weight(BW) or body mass index (BMI) in reflux patients while on long-term PPI therapy has not been examined.

A clinical research team from Japan elucidatied the effect on nutritional parameters such as body weight and BMI in patients receiving long-term PPI therapy. Their study will be published on October 14, 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology.

The subjects were 52 patients with GERD and 58 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. GERD patients were treated with PPI for a mean of 2.2 years (range, 0.8-5.7 years), and also advised on lifestyle modifications (e.g. selective diet, weight management). BW, BMI and other parameters were measured at baseline and end of study.

Their results showed there were no differences in BW and BMI between reflux patients and controls at baseline. Patients with GERD showed increases in BW, but no such changes were noted in the control group. Mean BW increased by 3.5 kg (6.2% of baseline) in 37 (71%) reflux patients but decreased in only 6 (12%) patients during treatment.

They concluded that reflux patients treated with a daily maintenance therapy of PPI should be strongly encouraged to manage their body weight through lifestyle modifications such as proper diet and avoidance of overeating. This measure may reduce the overall medical costs associated with obesity-related illness as well as GERD. Lifestyle modification must therefore remain the backbone of treatment for all patients with GERD, even in the PPI era.
-end-
Reference: Yoshikawa I, Nagato M, Yamasaki M, Kume K, Otsuki M. Long-term treatment with proton pump inhibitor is associated with undesired weight gain. World J Gastroenterol 2009; 15(38): 4794-4798

http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/15/4794.asp

Correspondence to: Ichiro Yoshikawa, MD, PhD, Third Department of Internal Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, School of Medicine, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555, Japan. ichiro@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp

Telephone: +81-93-6031611 Fax: +81-93-6920107

About World Journal of Gastroenterology

World Journal of Gastroenterology (WJG), a leading international journal in gastroenterology and hepatology, has established a reputation for publishing first class research on esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, viral hepatitis, colorectal cancer, and H. pylori infection and provides a forum for both clinicians and scientists. WJG has been indexed and abstracted in Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, Science Citation Index Expanded (also known as SciSearch) and Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Index Medicus, MEDLINE and PubMed, Chemical Abstracts, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Abstracts Journals, Nature Clinical Practice Gastroenterology and Hepatology, CAB Abstracts and Global Health. ISI JCR 2008 IF: 2.081. WJG is a weekly journal published by WJG Press. The publication dates are the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day of every month. WJG is supported by The National Natural Science Foundation of China, No. 30224801 and No. 30424812, and was founded with the name of China National Journal of New Gastroenterology on October 1, 1995, and renamed WJG on January 25, 1998.

World Journal of Gastroenterology

Related Body Weight Articles from Brightsurf:

Weight gainers more likely to underestimate their true body size
People with obesity who gain weight have a tendency to perceive their own body size as smaller than it actually is compared to those who maintain a stable weight, according to new research following more than 2,000 people with obesity from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study over 10 years.

Body weight has surprising, alarming impact on brain function
Amsterdam and Costa Mesa, CA, August 5, 2020 - As a person's weight goes up, all regions of the brain go down in activity and blood flow, according to a new brain imaging study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

Brain insulin sensitivity determines body weight and fat distribution
Just where fat is deposited in the body and to what degree a person may benefit from a lifestyle intervention depends on how sensitive the brain is to insulin.

Examining association between childhood video game use, adolescent body weight
Researchers looked at whether there was a long-term association between using video games at an early age and later weight as a teenager, as well as what role behaviors such as physical activity, the regularity of bedtimes and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages might play.

Brain receptor that regulates body heat may also help accelerate weight loss
The brain mechanism that enables us to maintain a constant body temperature may also be the key to rapid weight loss, a new study finds.

Short-term study suggests vegan diet can boost gut microbes related to body weight, body composition and blood sugar control
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept.

Increased body weight in adolescent boys linked with heart attack before 65
A study in nearly 1.7 million 18-year-old boys has found that higher body mass index (BMI) is linked with greater risk of a heart attack before 65 years of age.

Excess weight and body fat cause cardiovascular disease
In the first Mendelian randomization study to look at this, researchers have found evidence that excess weight and body fat cause a range of heart and blood vessel diseases (rather than just being associated with it).

New brain mechanisms regulating body weight
Researchers at University of Gothenburg, Sweden, clarify the link between the molecule interleukine-6 (IL-6) in the brain and obesity.

Excess body weight before 50 is associated with higher risk of dying from pancreatic cancer
Excess weight before age 50 may be more strongly associated with pancreatic cancer mortality risk than excess weight at older ages, according to results of a study presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.

Read More: Body Weight News and Body Weight Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.