ONR lecture focuses on Brazil's growth in global science and technology

October 22, 2010

ARLINGTON, Va.--Brazil's efforts to increase government investment in science and technology, as well expand its global presence, were the focus of the third Office of Naval Research (ONR)-sponsored International Lecture Series held Oct. 18 at the organization´s corporate headquarters.

"The Arrival of Brazil" lecture featured Dr. William Melton, surface ship coordinator, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock; Dr. Eugenius Kaszkurewicz, director of scientific development and technological financier of studies and projects (FINEP), ministry of science and technology; Dr. Fernando Rizzo, director, Center for Strategic Studies and Management: science, technology & innovation; and Dr. Jaime Fretias, electronic science and technology research, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory.

Brazil has steadily risen over the years to become an innovative force in the international community, said Dr. Larry Schuette, ONR's director of innovation, and sponsor of the lecture.

"With favorable macroeconomic conditions and the introduction of national science, technology and innovation policy as a government priority, Brazil is a country that we should continue to watch, learn from and identify shared interests to partner in," Schuette said.

These lectures help ONR understand and identify emerging science and technology (S&T), and build relationships with the external research community, Schuette said. They also inspire and challenge ONR's program officers to pursue world-class research.

The Office of Innovation promotes, fosters and develops innovative science, technology, processes and policies that support the Department of the Navy. ONR's lecture series features leaders in innovation, from a global, academia and military perspective. They are intended to open the aperture to the innovative research being conducted across the globe, Schuette said.

Lecture speaker Kaszkurewicz told attendees there are opportune areas for Brazil and the United States to partner in S&T, including advanced materials; biotechnologies and nanotechnologies; chip design; climate change; health and space; and defense.

While Brazil is taking its approach to S&T seriously, its government is investing 1.2 percent of its gross domestic product in S&T, lecture speaker Kaszkurewic said, adding more needs to be done in the coming decade.

He noted, for example, the country lags in high-technology exports: "The main objective of [Brazil's] science, technology and innovation investments is to push that line to the right."

ONR's previous international lectures have explored innovation in China and India. The next lecture series is scheduled from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 16 at ONR, and will feature Peter W. Singer, director of the 21st Century Defense Initiative, a senior fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution and author of "Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century."
-end-
For more information about ONR's lecture series, contact Melody Cook at melody.cook.ctr@navy.mil.

About the Office of Naval Research

The Office of Naval Research provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps' technological advantage. Through its affiliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and 914 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,400 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C.

Office of Naval Research

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