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24-hour ICU in-house staff intensivist improves mortality and decreases length of stay

October 22, 2012

The implementation of a 24-h ICU in-house staff intensivist coverage was associated with improved mortality rates and reduced length of stay, along with quicker decision-making and a positive trend in quality of end-of-life care.

In two separate studies, researchers analyzed outcomes data prior to and after the implementation of the 24-h intensivist staffing model. Both studies showed significant improvements after the staffing change, including reduced mortality rates, decreased length of stay by nearly a half day, as well as improved decision-making and improved quality of care at the end-of-life.

The studies were presented during CHEST 2012, the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians, held October 20 - 25, in Atlanta, Georgia.
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American College of Chest Physicians

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