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Chest band may relieve a chronic cough

October 22, 2012

A soft, extendible band fitted around the chest may help to relieve cough in patients with persistent dry cough.

Over the course of 1 year, Japanese researchers evaluated the antitussive effect of the chest band worn for 8 hours a day in 56 patients with chronic cough due to a variety of conditions. Results showed that 88% (n=49) of patients improved their cough scores, and 59% (n=33) were able to reduce the cough.

Researchers conclude that soft chest band therapy for intractable, prolonged, and chronic cough is a safe and effective therapy.

This study was presented during CHEST 2012, the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians, held October 20 - 25, in Atlanta, Georgia.
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American College of Chest Physicians

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