Nav: Home

Guideline implementation may impact VTE quality of care

October 22, 2012

The quality of care of patients hospitalized with venous thromboembolism (VTE) significantly improved between 2005 and 2009, and researchers suggest these improvements may be due to the implementation of VTE treatment guidelines.

Using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, researchers from Inova Fairfax Hospital and Betty and Guy Beatty Center for Integrated Research, Falls Church, Virginia, reviewed quality care measures in 800,000 VTE discharges that took place from 2005 to 2009.

Results showed that in-hospital mortality and length of stay decreased during this time, while total cost per case remained stable. Results also indicated that VTE diagnosis increased, as did severity of illness. Researchers speculate that VTE care improvements may be tied to the implementation of VTE treatment guidelines and more aggressive care.

This study was presented during CHEST 2012, the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians, held October 20 - 25, in Atlanta, Georgia.
-end-


American College of Chest Physicians

Related Venous Thromboembolism Articles:

Patients at a reduced risk of venous thromboembolism and persistent pain after partial versus total knee replacement
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate reduced risk of venous thromboembolism and persistent pain, but increased risk of revision in partial versus total knee replacement in patients with osteoarthritis.
PET/CT imaging agent shows promise for better diagnosis of acute venous thromboembolism
Researchers report that a new nuclear medicine tracer may allow better diagnosis of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE).
ASH releases new clinical practice guidelines for venous thromboembolism
Venous thromboembolism (VTE), a term referring to blood clots in the veins, is a highly prevalent and far-reaching public health problem that can cause disability and death.
Certain diabetes drugs linked to increased risk of lower limb amputation
Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors to treat type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of lower limb amputation and diabetic ketoacidosis (a serious diabetes complication) compared with another group of drugs called glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor agonists, finds a study in The BMJ today.
Comparable risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism between patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism and patients with cancer
Patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) carry a high risk of recurrence.
More Venous Thromboembolism News and Venous Thromboembolism Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...