Nav: Home

ONR to dial up faster data for the Marines

October 22, 2012

ARLINGTON, Va. - Office of Naval Research (ONR) officials announced a new program Oct. 22 to optimize tactical handheld technology for quick decision-making in the field.

The Exchange of Actionable Information at the Tactical Edge (EAITE) program, designed to sift through data from multiple sources for faster analysis, is among more than a dozen Future Naval Capability (FNC) programs kicking off in fiscal year 2014.

ONR Director of Transition Dr. Thomas Killion explained the need for the program--and how it benefits both the U.S. Navy and industry--during an FNC overview at the 2012 ONR Naval Science & Technology Partnership Conference.

"EAITE gives the U.S. Navy a means to build on industry advances in mobile technology and cloud computing to develop and ultimately transition a cutting-edge product to acquisition managers and ultimately the warfighter," Killion said.

Currently, information feeds from sensors and other assets flow into command centers, where intelligence analysts make sense of the material before it is shipped down to lower echelon troops. This process can take hours or even days. Complicating the situation, access to many more data sources and advanced analytic technology could threaten Marines with information overload.

EAITE aims to cut that delivery time down to minutes or even seconds by using automation to sift through data and send only the most relevant information to Marines operating handheld devices, said John Moniz, C4 program officer in ONR's Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Department.

"We want to figure out what we can automate and how we go about automating it so we can take all of these various sources of data and create something that can immediately be used by the end-user," Moniz said.

Under EAITE, researchers will develop firmware and software to distill imagery and information from unmanned aircraft feeds and other sources, efficiently move it over a tactical network and present it in an immediately understandable form to decision-makers on the battlefield.

Trimming the so-called "data to decisions" timeline down to minutes would be a drastic improvement, but researchers know there are situations when Marines need critical information even sooner.

"We would like to have some sort of warning that tells them when something that could put them in danger is getting close, and we need to get that to them in seconds," Moniz said.

In addition to EAITE, the new crop of FY14 FNC initiatives includes: a gel-wound cover for managing blast injuries in forward locations; real-time detection and assessment of traumatic brain injury in theater; an undersea weapon system that can autonomously neutralize surface and subsurface threats in shallow and intermediate waters; and surveillance tools for unmanned aircraft that can autonomously detect improvised explosive device precursors and hidden targets.

In general, the FNC program's goal is to match solutions with acquisition requirements to close warfighting gaps within five years.

A complete listing of the FNCs, along with the 2012 FNC Guidebook, is available online at http://www.onr.navy.mil/Science-Technology/Directorates/Transition/Future-Naval-Capabilities-FNC.aspx.
-end-
ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps' technological advantage. Through its affiliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and 914 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,400 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C.

By Eric Beidel, Office of Naval Research

Office of Naval Research

Related Data Articles:

Data centers use less energy than you think
Using the most detailed model to date of global data center energy use, researchers found that massive efficiency gains by data centers have kept energy use roughly flat over the past decade.
Storing data in music
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a technique for embedding data in music and transmitting it to a smartphone.
Life data economics: calling for new models to assess the value of human data
After the collapse of the blockchain bubble a number of research organisations are developing platforms to enable individual ownership of life data and establish the data valuation and pricing models.
Geoscience data group urges all scientific disciplines to make data open and accessible
Institutions, science funders, data repositories, publishers, researchers and scientific societies from all scientific disciplines must work together to ensure all scientific data are easy to find, access and use, according to a new commentary in Nature by members of the Enabling FAIR Data Steering Committee.
Democratizing data science
MIT researchers are hoping to advance the democratization of data science with a new tool for nonstatisticians that automatically generates models for analyzing raw data.
Getting the most out of atmospheric data analysis
An international team including researchers from Kanazawa University used a new approach to analyze an atmospheric data set spanning 18 years for the investigation of new-particle formation.
Ecologists ask: Should we be more transparent with data?
In a new Ecological Applications article, authors Stephen M. Powers and Stephanie E.
Should you share data of threatened species?
Scientists and conservationists have continually called for location data to be turned off in wildlife photos and publications to help preserve species but new research suggests there could be more to be gained by sharing a rare find, rather than obscuring it, in certain circumstances.
Futuristic data storage
The development of high-density data storage devices requires the highest possible density of elements in an array made up of individual nanomagnets.
Making data matter
The advent of 3-D printing has made it possible to take imaging data and print it into physical representations, but the process of doing so has been prohibitively time-intensive and costly.
More Data News and Data Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.