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Evolution of aesthetic dentistry

October 22, 2019

Alexandria, VA, USA - 2019 marks the Centennial of the Journal of Dental Research (JDR). Over the last century the JDR has been dedicated to the dissemination of new knowledge and information on all sciences relevant to dentistry and to the oral cavity and associated structures in health and disease. To celebrate, the JDR is featuring a yearlong, commemorative article and podcast series that highlights topics that have transformed dental, oral and craniofacial research over the past 100 years.

One of the main goals of dental treatment is to mimic teeth and design smiles in the most natural and esthetic manner, based on the individual and specific needs of the patient. The JDR Centennial article "Evolution of Esthetic Dentistry," by Markus B. Blatz, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA, Gerald Chiche, Augusta University Dental College of Georgia, USA, Oded Bahat, Beverly Hills, California, USA, Richard Roblee, Roblee Orthodontics, Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA, Christian Coachman, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA and Harald Heymann, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA, provides a historical review of the evolution of esthetic dentistry over the past 100 years and highlights advances in the development of dental research and clinical interventions that have contributed to the science and art of esthetic dentistry.

"There is strong scientific evidence that the appearance of a person's face and teeth has a profound impact on the perception and judgment by others," said Blatz. "The options to reach the goal of mimicking the most natural esthetics have significantly improved over the last decade. In the future, artificial intelligence and machine learning will likely lead to automation of esthetic evaluation, smile design and treatment planning processes."

"Among the most noteworthy advancements in esthetic dentistry over the past decade are the establishment of universal esthetic rules and guidelines, the development of tooth whitening and advanced restorative and prosthetic materials, progress in orthodontics and periodontal and oral and maxillofacial surgery," said Chiche. "And most recently, the implementation of digital technologies in the 3D planning and realization of truly natural and individual smiles."
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The November 2019 issue of the JDR also includes a JDR Centennial podcast "Evolution of Esthetic Dentistry," which features a conversation between Blatz, Chiche and AADR Past President Jack Ferracane, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA, and Historical Highlight 12 on the cause of mottled enamel by JDR Associate Editor, Nicholas Jakubovics, Newcastle University, England.

The legacy of the JDR was honored during a celebration at the 97th General Session of the IADR, held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the AADR and the 43rdAnnual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada on June 19-22, 2019. For more information on the JDR Centennial, please visit: http://www.iadr.org/JDRcentennial.

Click here to view a PDF of this press release.

About the Journal of Dental Research

The IADR/AADR Journal of Dental Research (JDR) is a multidisciplinary journal dedicated to the dissemination of new knowledge in all sciences relevant to dentistry and the oral cavity and associated structures in health and disease. The JDR continues to rank #1 of 90 journals in Eigenfactor with a score of 0.021290, ranks #2 in Impact Factor of 90 journals in the "Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine" category at 5.125 and ranks #2 of 90 in Article Influence with a score of 1.643.The JDR's 5-year Impact Factor has remained above 5 for the fourth year at 5.722, ranking #2 of 91 journals. With over 20,000 citations, the JDR also boasts the most citations in the "Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine" category -- 4,500 citations above the second ranked journal in the field.

International Association for Dental Research

The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) is a nonprofit organization with over 11,400 individual members worldwide, with a Mission to drive dental, oral and craniofacial research to advance health and well-being worldwide. To learn more, visit http://www.iadr.org. The American Association for Dental Research (AADR) is the largest Division of IADR with 3,300 members in the United States. To learn more, visit http://www.iadr.org/aadr.

International & American Associations for Dental Research

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