Why is fertilizer used in explosives? (video)

October 22, 2020

WASHINGTON, Oct. 22, 2020 -- Over the last century, the compound ammonium nitrate has been involved in at least 30 disasters and terrorist attacks. Under normal circumstances, it's totally harmless and used in things like fertilizer, so what makes ammonium nitrate turn deadly?: https://youtu.be/-SeT3N3A19c.
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