John Brauman to receive Linus Pauling Medal for achievements in chemistry

October 23, 2002

Chemist John I. Brauman will receive the 2002 Linus Pauling Medal at a symposium and banquet at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Wash., on Nov. 9.

Brauman, the J. G. Jackson and C. J. Wood Professor of Chemistry and cognizant dean for the natural sciences, is the 36th recipient of the award, which recognizes outstanding achievement in chemistry. Named for Nobel laureate Linus Pauling, a former Stanford faculty member and native of the Pacific Northwest, the award is presented annually by the Oregon, Portland and Puget Sound sections of the American Chemical Society.

Brauman is being recognized for his research on how molecules react and the factors that determine the rates and products of chemical reactions. He is the sixth Stanford faculty member - including Pauling - to receive the honor.

The Nov. 9 event begins with a symposium, "Chemical Reactivity: In the Laboratory, Biology and the Environment," to be held from 1 to 5:30 p.m. at Lagerquist Hall in the Mary Baker-Russell Music Building on the Pacific Lutheran University (PLU) campus. Four speakers are scheduled: Brauman, University of California-Berkeley chemist Kristie Boering, Stanford chemist James Collman and Stanford engineer David Golden. The symposium is free and open to the public.

Brauman also will present an after-dinner talk, "How Technology Impacts Basic Science," at a banquet to be held at PLU's Scandinavian Cultural Center at 7 p.m. Reservations for the banquet must be received by Oct. 31. For more information, contact Toni Curtis at 253-535-7530, curtisaa@plu.edu; or Craig Fryhle at 206-535-7530, fryhle@chem.plu.edu.
-end-
News Service website: http://www.stanford.edu/news/

Stanford Report (university newspaper): http://news.stanford.edu

Most recent news releases from Stanford: http://www.stanford.edu/dept/news/html/releases.html

To change contact information for these news releases: news-service@llists.stanford.edu Phone: 650-723-2558

Relevant Web URLs:
http://www.chem.plu.edu/pauling_award
http://www.stanford.edu/dept/chemistry/faculty/brauman/

Additional Contact Information:
COMMENT: John Brauman, Chemistry: 650-723-3023, brauman@stanford.edu

Craig Fryhle, Pacific Lutheran University: 206-535-7530, fryhle@chem.plu.edu.

EDITORS:A photo of Professor Brauman is available at http://newsphotos.stanford.edu (slug: "Brauman").

Stanford University

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