Percutaneous valve therapy: is it safe and effective?

October 23, 2007

WASHINGTON, DC - October 22, 2007 - Researchers at TCT 2007, the annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), will present new studies evaluating a rapidly advancing field within interventional cardiology: percutaneous procedures to repair and replace defective heart valves.

Percutaneous valve procedures, which are currently approved only in Europe, are under study in the U.S. In particular, researchers are studying the safety and effectiveness of the devices being used and the techniques used to implant them, as well as the profile of patients who should receive them.

Several studies analyzing the safety and efficacy of percutaneous valve therapies will be presented at TCT 2007:In addition to these presentations, panel discussions were held on Sunday October 21, "Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair and Replacement," led by Ted Feldman, MD, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine. These panels discussed the various types of and approaches.
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For more information or interviews, contact David Harrison at 410-804-1728.

About CRF and TCT

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) in New York City is an independent, non-profit academic institution dedicated to improving the survival and quality of life of patients with cardiovascular disease through research and education. For more than 15 years, CRF has played a major role in realizing dramatic improvements in the lives of patients by establishing the safe use of new technologies and therapies in the subspecialty of interventional cardiology and endovascular medicine.

The Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium, conducted by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, is a global gathering of physicians, researchers, technologists, and industry colleagues working in the field of interventional vascular medicine. It is the world's largest privately-run medical conference, attended by more than 10,000 participants each year and featuring the video transmission of more than 100 live patient cases from medical centers around the world. Including lectures, discussion panels, and workshops on the latest clinical findings and cutting-edge technologies, TCT educates medical professionals to ensure that the work of physicians and researchers is translated into improved patient care.

For more information, please visit www.crf.org

Cardiovascular Research Foundation

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