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USPSTF recommendation statement on screening for intimate partner violence, elder abuse, and abuse of vulnerable adults

October 23, 2018

Bottom Line: The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends clinicians screen women of reproductive age for intimate partner violence and then connect women who screen positive to ongoing support services. However, current evidence is insufficient regarding screening older or vulnerable adults for abuse and neglect.

Background: The USPSTF routinely makes recommendations about the effectiveness of preventive care services. This latest statement is an update of its 2013 recommendation on screening for intimate partner violence (IPV), elder abuse, and abuse of vulnerable adults, which are common in the United States but often remain undetected. In addition to the immediate effects of intimate partner violence, which may include injury and death, there may be other health consequences, including the development of depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and chronic pain. Long-term negative health effects from elder abuse may include higher risk of nursing home placement and death.

Related Material

The following related elements from The JAMA Network are also available on the For The Media website:

-- Screening for Intimate Partner Violence, Elder Abuse, and Abuse of Vulnerable Adults - US Preventive Services Task Force Final Recommendation Statement

-- Screening for Intimate Partner Violence, Elder Abuse, and Abuse of Vulnerable Adults - Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force

-- JAMA editorial: Challenges and Opportunities for Studying Routine Screening for Abuse

-- JAMA Internal Medicine editorial: Addressing Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse of Older or Vulnerable Adults in the Health Care Setting - Beyond Screening

-- JAMA Patient Page: Screening for Intimate Partner Violence, Elder Abuse, and Abuse of Vulnerable Adults

To Learn More: The full report is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jama.2018.13022)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Note: More information about the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, its process, and its recommendations can be found on the newsroom page of its website.
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