Nav: Home

Artificial intelligence system gives fashion advice

October 23, 2019

People turn to many different sources for clothing style advice, from magazines to best friends to Instagram. Soon, though, you may be able to ask your smartphone.

A University of Texas at Austin computer science team, in partnership with researchers from Cornell Tech, Georgia Tech and Facebook AI Research, has developed an artificial intelligence system that can look at a photo of an outfit and suggest helpful tips to make it more fashionable. Suggestions may include tweaks such as selecting a sleeveless top or a longer jacket.

"We thought of it like a friend giving you feedback," said Kristen Grauman, a professor of computer science whose previous research has largely focused on visual recognition for artificial intelligence. "It's also motivated by a practical idea: that we can work with a given outfit to make small changes so it's just a bit better."

The tool, named Fashion++, uses visual recognition systems to analyze the color, pattern, texture and shape of garments in an image. It considers where edits will have the most impact. It then offers several alternative outfits to the user.

Fashion++ was trained using more than 10,000 images of outfits shared publicly on online sites for fashion enthusiasts. Finding images of fashionable outfits was easy, said graduate student Kimberly Hsiao. Finding unfashionable images proved challenging. So, she came up with a workaround. She mixed images of fashionable outfits to create less-fashionable examples and trained the system on what not to wear.

"As fashion styles evolve, the AI can continue to learn by giving it new images, which are abundant on the internet," Hsiao said.

Grauman and Hsiao will present their approach at next week's International Conference on Computer Vision in Seoul, South Korea.

Like all AI systems, bias can creep in through the data sets for Fashion++. The researchers pointed out that vintage looks are harder to recognize as stylish because training images came from the internet, which has been in wide use only since the 1990s. Additionally, because the users submitting images were mostly from North America, styles from other parts of the world don't show up as much. Another challenge is that many images of fashionable clothes appear on models, but bodies come in many sizes and shapes, affecting fashion choices. Next up, Grauman and Hsiao are working toward letting the AI learn what flatters different body shapes so its recommendations can be more tailored.

"We are examining the interaction between how a person's body is shaped and how the clothing would suit them. We're excited to broaden the applicability to people of all body sizes and shapes by doing this research," Grauman said.
-end-


University of Texas at Austin

Related Artificial Intelligence Articles:

Artificial intelligence can help some businesses but may not work for others
The temptation for businesses to use artificial intelligence and other technology to improve performance, drive down labor costs, and better the bottom line is understandable.
Artificial intelligence could help predict future diabetes cases
A type of artificial intelligence called machine learning can help predict which patients will develop diabetes, according to an ENDO 2020 abstract that will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.
Artificial intelligence for very young brains
Montreal's CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital and the ÉTS engineering school pool their expertise to develop an innovative new technology for the segmentation of neonatal brain images.
Putting artificial intelligence to work in the lab
An Australian-German collaboration has demonstrated fully-autonomous SPM operation, applying artificial intelligence and deep learning to remove the need for constant human supervision.
Composing new proteins with artificial intelligence
Scientists have long studied how to improve proteins or design new ones.
Artificial intelligence and family medicine: Better together
Researcher at the University of Houston are encouraging family medicine physicians to actively engage in the development and evolution of artificial intelligence to open new horizons that make AI more effective, equitable and pervasive.
Artificial Intelligence to improve the precision of mammograms
The Artificial Intelligence techniques, used in combination with evaluations by expert radiologists, improve the precision in the detection of cancer through mammograms.
Using artificial intelligence to assess ulcerative colitis
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have developed an artificial intelligence system with a deep neural network that can effectively evaluate endoscopic data from patients with ulcerative colitis, which is a type of inflammatory bowel disease, without the need for biopsy collection.
Robot uses artificial intelligence and imaging to draw blood
Rutgers engineers have created a tabletop device that combines a robot, artificial intelligence and near-infrared and ultrasound imaging to draw blood or insert catheters to deliver fluids and drugs.
Artificial intelligence yields new antibiotic
Using a machine-learning algorithm, MIT researchers have identified a powerful new antibiotic compound.
More Artificial Intelligence News and Artificial Intelligence Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.