MedImmune to present abstracts on RSV and influenza at 48th Annual ICAAC/46th Annual IDSA Meeting

October 24, 2008

WASHINGTON, D.C., October 25, 2008 - MedImmune announced today it will present nine abstracts at the 48th Annual Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC)/46th Annual Meeting of Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA). These abstracts advance the knowledge about respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza, providing valuable insight into infectious disease prevention and underscoring MedImmune's leadership in this disease category.

"MedImmune is committed to conducting innovative infectious disease research to determine how best to prevent serious illness that can negatively impact pediatric health, especially during this time of year," said Alexander A. Zukiwski, M.D., executive vice president and chief medical officer. "We believe the data being presented at this meeting will help lead to important new healthcare solutions, and our company is proud to advance our already robust research base to identify the best ways to help protect children."

MedImmune abstracts to be presented at ICAAC/IDSA on RSV include: MedImmune abstracts to be presented at ICAAC/IDSA on influenza include:
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Additional information about the 2008 ICAAC/IDSA conference can be found at http://www.icaacidsa2008.org/.

About Synagis

Synagis® (palivizumab) is indicated for the prevention of serious lung infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children at high risk of RSV disease. Synagis is given as a shot, usually in the thigh muscle, each month during the RSV season. The first dose of Synagis should be given before RSV season begins. Children who develop an RSV infection while receiving Synagis should continue the monthly dosing schedule throughout the season. Synagis has been used in more than one million children in the U.S. since its introduction in 1998.

Synagis should not be used in patients with a history of severe prior reaction to Synagis or its components. Cases of severe allergic reactions such as anaphylaxis and other types of hypersensitivity reactions have been reported with Synagis. These reactions may occur when any dose of Synagis is given, not just the first one. Another serious side effect, which may lead to unusual bruising and/or groups of pinpoint red spots found on the skin, has been reported.

Most common side effects with Synagis may include upper respiratory tract infection, ear infection, fever, and runny nose. In children born with heart problems, Synagis was associated with reports of low blood oxygen levels and abnormal heart rhythms. Side effects, such as, skin reactions around the area where the shot was given (like redness, swelling, warmth, or discomfort) have also been reported.

Please see accompanying full prescribing information at www.synagis.com.

About FluMist

FluMist® (Influenza Virus Vaccine Live, Intranasal) is a live attenuated influenza virus vaccine indicated for active immunization of individuals two to 49 years of age against influenza disease caused by influenza virus subtypes A and type B contained in the vaccine.

FluMist is contraindicated in individuals with history of hypersensitivity to eggs, egg proteins, gentamicin, gelatin or arginine or with life- threatening reactions to previous influenza vaccinations, and in children and adolescents receiving concomitant aspirin or aspirin-containing therapy.

Do not administer FluMist to children less than two years of age due to an increased risk of hospitalization and wheezing that was observed in clinical trials. FluMist should not be administered to any individual with asthma and to children less than five years of age with recurrent wheezing unless the potential benefit outweighs the potential risk. Do not administer FluMist to individuals with severe asthma or active wheezing.

If Guillain-Barre syndrome has occurred with prior influenza vaccination or if an individual is immunocompromised, the decision to give FluMist should be based on careful consideration of the potential benefits and risks. FluMist should not be administered to individuals with underlying medical conditions predisposing them to wild-type influenza infection complications unless the potential benefit outweighs the potential risk. FluMist should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.

Most common adverse reactions (occurring in 10 percent or more of individuals receiving FluMist and at a rate at least five percent higher than in those receiving placebo) are runny nose or nasal congestion in recipients of all ages, fever more than 100 degrees F in children two to six years of age, and sore throat in adults.

FluMist may not protect all individuals receiving the vaccine. FluMist is for intranasal administration only.

Please see complete Prescribing Information for FluMist, call 1-877-FLUMIST (1-877-358-6478) or visit http://www.flumist.com/prescribing-information.aspx for additional information.

About MedImmune

MedImmune is a leading innovation-focused biotechnology company whose mission is to provide better medicines to patients, new medical options for physicians and rewarding careers to employees. Dedicated to advancing science and medicine to help people live better lives, the company is focused on infection, oncology, respiratory disease and inflammation, cardiovascular/ gastrointestinal disease and neuroscience. Headquartered in Gaithersburg, Maryland, MedImmune has approximately 3,000 employees worldwide and is the wholly owned biologics business for AstraZeneca plc (LSE: AZN.L, NYSE: AZN). For more information, visit MedImmune's website at www.medimmune.com.

Edelman Public Relations

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