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Collagen hydrogel scaffold and fibroblast growth factor-2 accelerate periodontal healing of class II

October 24, 2016

A new regenerative scaffold made of biosafe collagen hydrogel and collagensponge could possess the ability of retaining fibroblastic growth factor-2 (FGF2) and stimulate the periodontal tissue regeneration, according to new research published in The Open Dentistry Journal.

The authors of the new paper from the Department of Periodontology and Endodontology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine, exhibited the new scaffold and revealed that it would improve the outcome of periodontal regenerative surgery and support to prevent tooth loss, compared to existing scaffold materials.

In periodontal regenerative therapy, stable periodontal attachments, including the cementum and periodontal ligament, should be reformed on the instrumented tooth root surface, and should stimulate alveolar bone regeneration. However, it is difficult to reform periodontal attachment because the rapid growth of the junctional epithelium and gingival connective tissue inhibit the growth of periodontal tissue associated with periodontal attachment. Therefore, development of compatible biomaterial against the periodontal stem cells, progenitors and tissues is required for a predictable periodontal regenerative procedure.

Collagen hydrogels cross-linked by an ascorbate-copper ion system exhibit high fluidity. To promote its operability, the researchers injected the FGF2-loaded collagen hydrogel into the biocompatible three-dimensional sponge form collagen before implantation.

The combination of collagen hydrogel scaffold and FGF2 exhibited good biodegradability of scaffold and remarkably promoted the periodontal healing, involving regeneration of cementum, periodontal ligament and matured alveolar bone, in beagle dogs. In addition, the quality of regenerated periodontal tissue was examined. FGF2-loaded hydrogel scaffold facilitated to form acellular cementum receiving insertions of Sharpey's fibers continuous to periodontal membrane fibers (true regeneration), suggests that regenerated periodontal tissue would be effective for resisting force of mastication.

It could replace the preexisting polymer scaffold and artificial bone graft in periodontal surgical therapy.
-end-
For more information about the article, please visit http://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TODENTJ-10-347

Reference: Momose, T.; et al, (2016). Collagen Hydrogel Scaffold and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Accelerate Periodontal Healing of Class II Furcation Defects in Dog, Open Dent. J., DOI: 10.2174/1874210601610010347

Bentham Science Publishers

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