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Patients report symptom improvement following prolotherapy for knee osteoarthritis

October 24, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, October 24, 2016-- Prolotherapy, an injection-based complementary treatment for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, was associated with improved knee-specific symptoms, quality of life, and ability to participate in daily activities among the majority of individuals who participated in several small clinical studies. This report documents the safety, comfort, and overall positive experiences with prolotherapy, as presented in an article in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine website until November 28, 2016.

Most participants described a substantial decrease in pain with injections of hypertonic dextrose in and around the affected knee joint, as reported in the article "Qualitative Assessment of Patients Receiving Prolotherapy for Knee Osteoarthritis in a Multimethod Study."

David Rabago, MD and coauthors from University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (Madison, WI), University of Chicago Hospitals (IL), Unity Point Health-Meriter, McKee Clinic-Family Medicine, and University of Wisconsin-Madison (Madison, WI), and University of Minnesota Medical School (Minneapolis, MN), identified a subgroup of individuals who had improved knee function without decreased pain.

"This qualitative study adds to Dr. Rabago's already significant contributions to understanding the role of prolotherapy as an alternative to usual care for those hampered by osteoarthritis of the knee," says The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine Editor-in-Chief John Weeks, johnweeks-integrator.com, Seattle, WA.
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About the Journal

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine is a monthly peer-reviewed journal published online with open access options and in print. Led by John Weeks (johnweeks-integrator.com), the Co-founder and past Executive Director of the Academic Collaborative for Integrative Health, the Journal provides observational, clinical, and scientific reports and commentary intended to help healthcare professionals, delivery organization leaders, and scientists evaluate and integrate therapies into patient care protocols and research strategies. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicinewebsite.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Alternative and Complementary Therapies, Medical Acupuncture, and Journal of Medicinal Food. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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