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Abaloparatide benefits a wide range of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

October 24, 2016

A recent analysis of results from a randomized controlled clinical trial indicates that abaloparatide-SC, a novel therapy for osteoporosis, provides consistent protection against bone fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis regardless of their baseline bone density, age, and previous history of fracture.

Investigators in the ACTIVE trial previously found that that the drug reduces fractures and increases bone mineral density in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. This latest analysis, which is published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (published by the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research), evaluated whether these benefits were consistent across different levels of baseline risk.

"The landmark ACTIVE trial results show that abaloparatide-SC may provide substantial benefit for a broad range of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis," said lead author Dr. Felicia Cosman. "Approximately two million osteoporotic fractures occur annually in the U.S., which create physical and psychological burdens for affected women by diminishing their independence and quality of life. Anabolic therapy could provide more consistent potent and early benefits to patients and may be the most efficient way to achieve ultimate bone mineral density goals."
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Wiley

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