Penn wins $5M to start center for ethical, legal and social implications research

October 25, 2007

PHILADELPHIA - A new Center for Excellence in Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) Research has been established at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, a collaboration with the Schools of Nursing and Arts and Sciences, the Wharton School and the Annenberg School for Communication.

The Penn Center for the Integration of Genetic Healthcare Technology (Penn CIGHT) will receive over $5 million over the next five years from the National Institutes of Health to study the certainty or uncertainty of results from genetic testing.

"The University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have outstanding expertise in studying the human genome and the causes of genetic diseases, and in the care, counseling and treatment of people with hereditary diseases," says Center director Reed Pyeritz, MD, PhD, Director of the Division of Medical Genetics at the Penn School of Medicine. "However, this expertise is spread over many centers and departments in multiple institutions. This grant begins the process of bringing together not only these people, but enabling them to interact with faculty and students from multiple disciplines from the wider university."

The overall goal of the Penn CIGHT is to develop tools that will help educate consumers, professionals, policy makers, and insurers understand and cope with the certainty or uncertainty of results from genetic technologies. Team members will conduct original research to evaluate genetic technologies including: Penn CIGHT is part of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)'s announcement earlier this month about the establishment of two new ELSI centers to address the most critical ethical, legal and social questions relating to genetics faced by clinicians, researchers, and patients. The other new center will be at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

"Examining the emerging ethical, legal and social implications of genomic research is central to our goal of safely and effectively moving discoveries into the clinic," said NHGRI Director Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD. "These centers will work to identify and address the most pressing issues being confronted by individuals, families, and communities as a result of genetic and genomic research."

The work of the new Penn center will be conducted by a team of experts representing a broad range of disciplines, such as medicine, bioethics, law, behavioral and social sciences, clinical research, public policy, economics, and genetic and genomic research. The interdisciplinary nature of this team will allow the center to develop innovative research approaches focused on specific sets of issues that relate to the numerous applications and uses of genomic research, technologies, and information. The Center will also train investigators in methods to evaluate the implications and utility of future genetic technologies and discoveries.

"The new Penn center will give us the structure and resources needed to respond quickly to the clinical integration of new genetic discoveries," say Bernhardt, a genetic counselor. "Our goal is to gather data that will allow us to make recommendations to ensure that the clinical applications of new genetic technologies result in the maximal benefit to the most people with the least associated risk and misunderstanding."
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A list and summary of other Centers of Excellence in ELSI Research is available at http://www.genome.gov/25522195.

This release is available at www.pennhealth.com/news

PENN Medicine is a $3.5 billion enterprise dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. PENN Medicine consists of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System.

Penn's School of Medicine is currently ranked #3 in the nation in U.S.News & World Report's survey of top research-oriented medical schools; and, according to most recent data from the National Institutes of Health, received over $379 million in NIH research funds in the 2006 fiscal year. Supporting 1,400 fulltime faculty and 700 students, the School of Medicine is recognized worldwide for its superior education and training of the next generation of physician-scientists and leaders of academic medicine.

The University of Pennsylvania Health System includes three hospitals -- its flagship hospital, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, rated one of the nation's "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S.News & World Report; Pennsylvania Hospital, the nation's first hospital; and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center -- a faculty practice plan; a primary-care provider network; two multispecialty satellite facilities; and home care and hospice.

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

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