Founder of international telecom company and more to be honored by NJIT

October 25, 2011

Three notable engineers, including the founder of an international telecom company, who have achieved notable success in the international business community will be honored by NJIT for their achievements at the university's annual celebration event, set this year for Nov. 11, 2011.

Electrical engineer and alumnus Ying Wu, a general partner with CTC Capital since 2007, will receive NJIT's Edward F. Weston Medal for Professional Achievement. Wu co-founded UTStarcom, Inc., serving for many years as the vice chair of the board of directors and executive vice president, while also serving as chairman and CEO of UTStarcom's Chinese subsidiary. Prior to then, Wu co-founded Starcom, Inc. which in 1995 merged to become what is today UT Starcom, based in California. Wu's career began at the former Bell Laboratories. He holds a master's degree in electrical engineering from NJIT and a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Beijing Industrial University. Wu was recognized in 1997 by Business Week as a "Star of Asia." In 2003, China Central TV named him one of the most influential people for China's economy. For more, see http://ir.focusmedia.cn/phoenix.zhtml?c=190067&p=irol-govBio&ID=178729

Richard S. Bowles III, PhD, executive vice president and chief ethics and compliance officer for Merck & Co., Inc. will be honored as a special friend of NJIT. Bowles returned to Merck after its merger with Schering-Plough Corporation in November 2009. Bowles had joined Schering-Plough in January 2001 as vice president, pharmaceutical manufacturing, and in March of the same year was appointed senior vice president, worldwide quality. He held the position of senior vice president, global quality operations, from March 2001 to November 2009. From 1974 through 2000, Bowles was employed by Merck & Co., Inc., where he held a variety of positions of increasing responsibility. Bowles earned both his BS and MS degrees in chemical engineering from Columbia University and a PhD in chemical engineering from Princeton University. For more, see: http://www.merck.com/about/leadership/executive-committee/home.html

Businessman and NJIT alumnus Lawrence A. Raia, PE, principal and founding partner of Raia Properties Corporation, a family business that invests in and manages Class A apartments in the southeast and southwest, will receive the President's Medal for Lifetime Achievement. Raia received a BS in civil engineering from NJIT's Newark College of Engineering, an MBA from Fairleigh Dickinson University and his professional engineering license from New Jersey. The family partnership began as a small concrete and construction materials company which grew to 10 plant sites and more than 500 employees. The company was sold in 1987 while the principals moved onto a real estate management company.
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NJIT, New Jersey's science and technology university, enrolls more than 9,558 students pursuing bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in 120 programs. The university consists of six colleges: Newark College of Engineering, College of Architecture and Design, College of Science and Liberal Arts, School of Management, College of Computing Sciences and Albert Dorman Honors College. U.S. News & World Report's 2011 Annual Guide to America's Best Colleges ranked NJIT in the top tier of national research universities. NJIT is internationally recognized for being at the edge in knowledge in architecture, applied mathematics, wireless communications and networking, solar physics, advanced engineered particulate materials, nanotechnology, neural engineering and e-learning. Many courses and certificate programs, as well as graduate degrees, are available online through the Office of Continuing Professional Education.

New Jersey Institute of Technology

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