Nav: Home

Wood at work: Elegant strategies for architecture, city building, and forest conservation

October 25, 2015

CONTACT:
Max Pulsinelli - 718-220-5182; mpulsinelli@wcs.org
John Delaney - 718-220-3275; jdelaney@wcs.org

Wood at Work: Elegant Strategies for Architecture, City Building, and Forest Conservation

WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) will host "Wood at Work: Elegant Strategies for Architecture, City Building, and Forest Conservation," an event focusing on the links between sustainably harvested wood and global efforts to conserve forests.

The event will convene at WCS's Bronx Zoo and provide a forum for urban planners, ecologists, foresters, policy makers and architects. The 120 conference attendees will also

Participate in panel discussions, lectures, and break-out sessions geared for promoting dialogue, inspiration, and networking. Participants will include city officials, scientists, writers, researchers, artists, and leaders in conservation and industry, all focusing on wood as a source of building material, ecological services, and cultural inspiration.

What: Wood at Work: Elegant Strategies for Architecture, City Building, and Forest Conservation

Date: Friday, Oct. 30

Time: Media check-in: Oct 30, 9 a.m.

Where: Schiff Family Great Hall
Bronx Zoo
2300 Southern Boulevard

Who: Kenneth Frampton, Keynote speaker, Columbia University
John F. Calvelli, Executive VP for Public Affairs, WCS
Eric Sanderson, Director of the Mannahatta Project, WCS
Lars Laestadius, World Resources Institute
Robin Chazdon, celebrated forest ecologist
Doug Boucher, Tropical Forests & Climate Initiative
Scott Francisco, Founder and Director, Pilot Projects
Michelle Roelofs, Senior Structure Engineer, Arup
John Vaillant, nature and science journalist

For the full list of speakers, go to: http://woodatwork.nyc/speakers
-end-
EDITOR'S NOTE: Members of the media who would like to cover this event must RSVP to Max Pulsinelli (mpulsinelli@wcs.org) at 718-220-5182, or John Delaney (jdelaney@wcs.org) at 718-220-3275.

WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society)

MISSION: WCS saves wildlife and wild places worldwide through science, conservation action, education, and inspiring people to value nature. To achieve our mission, WCS, based at the Bronx Zoo, harnesses the power of its Global Conservation Program in nearly 60 nations and in all the world's oceans and its five wildlife parks in New York City, visited by 4 million people annually. WCS combines its expertise in the field, zoos, and aquarium to achieve its conservation mission. Visit: newsroom.wcs.org Follow: @WCSNewsroom. For more information: 347-840-1242.

Wildlife Conservation Society

Related Conservation Articles:

Targeted conservation could protect more of Earth's biodiversity
A new study finds that major gains in global biodiversity can be achieved if an additional 5 percent of land is set aside to protect key species.
Conservation endocrinology in a changing world
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
Marine conservation must consider human rights
Ocean conservation is essential for protecting the marine environment and safeguarding the resources that people rely on for livelihoods and food security.
Mapping Biodiversity and Conservation Hotspots of the Amazon
Researchers have used remote sensing data to map out the functional diversity of the Peruvian Andes and Amazon basin, a technique that revealed hotspots for conservation.
Mapping biodiversity and conservation hotspots of the Amazon
Researchers have used remote sensing data to map out the functional diversity of the Peruvian Andes and Amazon basin, a technique that revealed hotspots for conservation.
Internet data could boost conservation
Businesses routinely use internet data to learn about customers and increase profits -- and similar techniques could be used to boost conservation.
Why conservation fails
The only way for northern countries to halt deforestation in the South is to make sure land owners are paid more than it costs them to conserve the forest.
Visitors to countryside not attracted by conservation importance
Countryside visitors choose where to go based on the presence of features such as coastline, woodland or abundant footpaths, rather than a site's importance to conservation, according to new research.
In communicating wildlife conservation, focus on the right message
If you want people to care about endangered species, focus on how many animals are left, not on the chances of a species becoming extinct, according to a new study by Cornell University communication scholars.
New partnership to boost Asia-Pacific conservation
The University of Adelaide and global organization Conservation International (CI) today announced a strategic partnership that will help boost conservation efforts in the Asia-Pacific region, including a global conservation drone program.

Related Conservation Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Setbacks
Failure can feel lonely and final. But can we learn from failure, even reframe it, to feel more like a temporary setback? This hour, TED speakers on changing a crushing defeat into a stepping stone. Guests include entrepreneur Leticia Gasca, psychology professor Alison Ledgerwood, astronomer Phil Plait, former professional athlete Charly Haversat, and UPS training manager Jon Bowers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".