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Science/Science Careers' survey ranks top biotech, biopharma, and pharma employers

October 25, 2018

The Science and Science Careers' 2018 annual Top Employers Survey polled employees in the biotechnology, biopharmaceutical, pharmaceutical, and related industries to determine the 20 best employers in these industries as well as their driving characteristics. Respondents to the web-based survey were asked to rate companies based on 23 characteristics, including financial strength, easy adaptation to change, and a research-driven environment.

For the third consecutive year in a row, Regeneron of Tarrytown, New York, receives the top honor in a ranking of the world's most respected employers. The rankings, determined from a study conducted by an independent research firm commissioned by the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, will appear in the 26 October 2018 print issue of Science and online at ScienceCareers.org.

Like Science and Science Careers' 2017 ranking of biopharma employers, the 2018 survey sought to identify the companies with the best reputations as employers. The findings are based on 8,015 completed surveys from readers of Science and other survey invitees. Survey respondents came from North America (63%), Europe (24%), and Asia/Pacific Rim (9%); 93% work in biotechnology, biopharmaceutical, and pharmaceutical companies.

Survey responses were analyzed by The Brighton Consulting Group, which used a mathematical process to determine the driving characteristics of a top employer and to assign a unique score to rate each company's employer reputation. Each company received a ranking, for example, on the basis of whether it treats its employees with respect, whether its work-culture values align with employees' personal values, and other driving characteristics.

For the complete feature along with individual company rankings, go to www.sciencecareers.org/TopEmployers2018.

The article will be posted at this URL address the evening of October 25, 2018.
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The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science, as well as Science Translational Medicine; Science Signaling; a digital, open-access journal, Science Advances; Science Immunology; and Science Robotics. AAAS was founded in 1848 and includes nearly 250 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world. The nonprofit AAAS is open to all and fulfills its mission to "advance science and serve society" through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, public engagement, and more. For additional information about AAAS, see www.aaas.org.

American Association for the Advancement of Science

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