Detection of oral HPV DNA in teen, young adult females

October 25, 2019

Bottom Line: Researchers tested for HPV DNA in oral rinse samples collected over 10 years from a group of sexually active females (ages 13 to 21) who were planning to or had received the vaccine that targets four types of HPV. HPV was detected in 6.2% of 1,259 participants at baseline but oral HPV detection became less likely with time since becoming sexually active. And, researchers report detection of the HPV types targeted by the vaccine was even less likely among those who received at least one dose of the vaccine compared with those who were fully unvaccinated. Study cohort characteristics include a population that had more sexual partners and an earlier initiation of sexual activity than other groups that have been studied. HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection that is associated with increased risk of some cancers, including in the oral cavity.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ 

Authors: Nicolas F. Schlecht, Ph.D., of the Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, New York, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.14031)

Editor's Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
-end-
Media advisory: To contact corresponding author Nicolas F. Schlecht, Ph.D., email Annie Deck-Miller at annie.deck-miller@roswellpark.org. The full study and commentary are linked to this news release.

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About JAMA Network Open: JAMA Network Open is the new online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. Every Wednesday and Friday, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.

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