Cedars-Sinai Medical Tip Sheet for October 2000

October 26, 2000

TEXAS MAN IS AMONG FIRST TO UNDERGO A NEW FULLY ENDOSCOPIC PROCEDURE TO REMOVE SKULL-BASE TUMORS THROUGH AN INCISION BETWEEN THE EYES
A 55-year-old San Antonio electronics engineer is among the first patients to have a craniopharyngioma (tumor located along the bottom surface of the brain and directly behind the eyes) removed in a fully endoscopic, minimally invasive surgical procedure. He was discharged from the hospital just two days after the 10-hour procedure, and flew back home to San Antonio three days later. Using extremely thin, flexible and precise endoscopic instruments, this new surgical approach performed at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is making hospital stays and recovery times shorter.

PATIENTS WITH SEVERE EMPHYSEMA ENROLLED IN MAJOR, NATIONWIDE STUDY CONDUCTED AT CEDARS-SINAI MEDICAL CENTER
Patients with severe emphysema are being enrolled in a major, nationwide study -- the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) -- conducted at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, one of 17 sites in the U.S. Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Health Care Financing Administration, the study is comparing the outcomes of emphysema patients who receive maximum medical therapy with those who undergo medical therapy in combination with lung volume reduction surgery. All testing, transportation and accommodations are provided free of charge to patients enrolled in the study.

VOLUNTEERS AND STAFF AT CEDARS-SINAI MEDICAL CENTER BRING BALLOTS TO PATIENTS WHO CANNOT GO TO THE POLLS
With one of the tightest presidential elections in recent history just weeks away, each vote becomes even more important. "Going to the polls" and casting your ballot for president becomes more challenging when you're hospitalized, but Cedars-Sinai Medical Center volunteers make it possible for every patient to vote - right from his or her hospital bed. The logistics and planning that make this possible take two months and the tireless dedication of approximately 20 specially trained and selected volunteers.

HOLISTIC TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR TREATING AMERICA'S "FIRST ENVIRONMENTAL EPIDEMIC" - RESPIRATORY DISEASE
Respiratory disease has become America's first environmental epidemic, with nearly one-third of Americans afflicted with sinusitis, allergies, asthma or bronchitis , says Mary L. Hardy, M.D., director of the Integrative Medicine Medical Group. "While conventional medicine can often effectively treat the symptoms, most chronic respiratory sufferers are told that they simply must learn to 'live with it,'" says Dr. Hardy. "However, extending conventional medical therapies to include integrative approaches can be highly beneficial to many sufferers," she adds. Board-certified specialist in internal medicine, and a member of the American Botanical Society and the American Holistic Medical Association, Dr. Hardy is available to discuss from a holistic perspective, natural remedies for sinusitis, environmental asthma and related conditions.
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Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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