Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee meets Nov. 2-3 in Santa Barbara

October 26, 2010

The Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee (FAC), which advises the Department of Commerce, NOAA, and the Department of the Interior on issues related to Executive Order 13158 and the national system of MPAs, will hold its 16th meeting, Nov. 2-3, 2010 in Santa Barbara, Calif.

The Committee will focus on developing draft recommendations based on the Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning and Communities and Land/Sea Interactions Subcommittees, as well as the Cultural Heritage Resources Workgroup. The Committee will also hear from two panels of MPA experts discussing how MPAs can help support healthy and resilient coastal communities, and how MPAs and its national system relate to the National Ocean Policy and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Initiatives. Efforts to integrate the national system of MPAs with the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), including using MPAs as ocean monitoring platforms, will also be discussed.

WHAT:
16th Meeting of the Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee
(Agenda is available on the MPA Web site: http://mpa.gov/fac/meetings
The meeting is open to the public and there will be one public comment session)

WHEN:
Tuesday, Nov. 2, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 3, 8:30 to 5:00 p.m.

WHERE: Fess Parker's Doubletree Resort, 633 East Cabrillo Blvd., Santa Barbara, Calif. 93103

WHO:
-end-
Additional information is available through NOAA's Kara Schwenke Yeager, designated federal official, MPA FAC, National Marine Protected Areas Center at 301-713-3100 ext. 162 or Kara.Schwenke@noaa.gov.

NOAA's mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Visit us online or at Facebook.

NOAA Headquarters

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