British Ecological Society partners with Wiley open access journal Ecology and Evolution

October 26, 2012

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., has announced a new partnership between the British Ecological Society (BES) and the Wiley Open Access journal Ecology and Evolution. This latest partnership brings the number of high profile journals supporting the open access title to 16. Eleven of these partner titles are ranked in the top 20 ecology journals by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI).

BES journals will join other high impact titles in offering authors a rapid manuscript transferal system which maintains the integrity of peer review and allows authors to meet the requirements of their funders.

Since the inaugural issue of Ecology and Evolution in September 2011, more than 250 papers have been published in the journal. The support of the five BES journal titles, all of which rank in the top 20% of ecology journals (ISI), will ensure Ecology and Evolution continues to attract the latest prestigious research from across the discipline.

Ecology and Evolution publishes papers under the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction, provided the original work is properly cited. An article publication charge (APC) is payable by authors on acceptance of their articles and under this new partnership BES members can take advantage of a 10% discount on this charge.

"Having published ecological journals for 100 years, we are delighted to announce this partnership as we embark on the BES's centenary year," said Georgina Mace, President of the BES. "Our established journals receive increasing numbers of high quality submissions each year and this involvement with Ecology and Evolution will enable us to further serve our ecological community by publishing more of this important ecological research."

Ecology and Evolution is also expanding its editorial expertise with the appointment of new editor Dr Andrew Beckerman, from the University of Sheffield, UK, who joins Allen Moore, from the University of Georgia, USA, in leading the journal.

Dr Beckerman is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Animal and Plant Sciences. His research links genetics, behaviour and life history to the distribution and abundance of organisms and the structure and dynamics of communities. Andrew has previously served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Animal Ecology and Ecology Letters.

"I am excited to join Allen and the team on this journal with its broad subject coverage cutting across ecology and evolution, and to become part of an interesting venture in open access publishing," said Dr Beckerman.

"We are thrilled that the BES has chosen to extend our 60-year relationship by collaborating with us on the open access journal, Ecology and Evolution," said Liz Ferguson, Editorial Director, Life Science, Wiley. "This new partnership is a great fit for the editorial ambitions of Ecology and Evolution and we are also delighted to welcome Andrew at this critical stage of the Journal's development."
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Wiley

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