Health care access improves with state-level medicaid expansion

October 26, 2017

New Rochelle, NY, October 26, 2017-A new study has shown that low-income U.S. residents living in Medicaid expansion states are significantly more likely to have health insurance and to receive a routine check-up compared to low-income residents of non-expansion states. While state Medicaid expansion has positively impacted access to health care for low-income Americans, in states that decided not to expand Medicaid coverage, very low-income residents have been disproportionately negatively affected, according to the study published in Population Health Management, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Population Health Management website until November 26, 2017.

The article entitled "The Effects of State Medicaid Expansion on Low-Income Individuals' Access to Health Care: Multilevel Modeling" presents the results obtained from analyzing a nationally representative sample of more than a half million adults from 50 states and Washington, DC. Coauthors Sunha Choi, PhD, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Sungkyu Lee, PhD, Soongsil University, Seoul, Korea, and Jason Matejkowski, PhD, University of Kansas, Lawrence, showed that not only were the residents of Medicaid expansion states more likely to have health insurance, but they were also significantly more likely to have a usual source of care and were less likely to avoid visiting a doctor because of cost.

"Given the current political environment and proposed deep cuts in Medicaid, this work emphasizes how vital access to care is for this population. Medicaid coverage promotes the health of the population," says David Nash, MD, MBA, Editor-in-Chief of Population Health Management and Dean and Dr. Raymond C. and Doris N. Grandon Professor, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.
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About the Journal

Population Health Management is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published bimonthly in print and online that reflects the expanding scope of health care management and quality. The Journal delivers a comprehensive, integrated approach to the field of population health and provides information designed to improve the systems and policies that affect health care quality, access, and outcomes. Comprised of peer-reviewed original research papers, clinical research, and case studies, the content encompasses a broad range of chronic diseases (such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic pain, diabetes, depression, and obesity) in addition to focusing on various aspects of prevention and wellness. Tables of Contents and a sample issue may be viewed on the Population Health Management website. Population Health Management is the official journal of the Population Health Alliance.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Women's Health, LGBT Health, Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, and Telemedicine and e-Health. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website. (http://www.liebertpub.com/)

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
140 Huguenot Street
New Rochelle, NY 10801
http://www.liebertpub.com
Phone: 914-740-2100
800-M-LIEBERT
Fax 914-740-2101

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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