Proinflammatory diet linked to higher risk of kidney disease progression

October 26, 2018

San Diego, CA (October 26, 2018) -- Diets that contribute to inflammation were linked with a higher risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression in a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 October 23-October 28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

CKD progression can be accompanied by chronic inflammation. To examine whether pro-inflammatory diets might increase the risk of CKD progression, Tanushree Banerjee, PhD (University of California, San Francisco) and her colleagues studied a national sample of 1,084 adults with CKD, where 11.1% of the participants developed kidney failure over 14 years of follow-up.

The investigators found that individuals with pro-inflammatory diets had a higher risk of developing kidney failure. "These findings have implications for the prevention of kidney failure using dietary approaches with low inflammatory potential," said Dr. Banerjee. "Nutritional interventions that focus on reducing the inflammatory aspects of diet should be tested for halting the progression of CKD."

Foods that have been positively related to concentrations of inflammatory markers include tomatoes; carbonated beverages; vegetables other than green leafy and dark yellow vegetables; and processed meat, red meat, organ meat, and fish other than dark-meat fish.
-end-
Study: "Pro-Inflammatory Diets Increase Risk of ESRD in U.S. Adults with CKD"

ASN Kidney Week 2018, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2018 will take place October 23 - October 28 at the San Diego Convention Center.  

Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has more than 20,000 members representing 131 countries. For more information, please visit http://www.asn-online.org.

American Society of Nephrology

Related Inflammation Articles from Brightsurf:

3D printed stents that treat inflammation
POSTECH Professor Dong-Woo Cho's research team develops bioink-loaded esophageal stents for treating radiation esophagitis.

New cause of inflammation in people with HIV identified
A new study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center examined what factors could be contributing to this inflammation, and they identified the inability to control HIV RNA production from existing HIV DNA as a potential key driver of inflammation.

Maltreatment tied to higher inflammation in girls
New research by a University of Georgia scientist reveals that girls who are maltreated show higher levels of inflammation at an early age than boys who are maltreated or children who have not experienced abuse.

A protein that controls inflammation
A study by the research team of Prof. Geert van Loo (VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research) has unraveled a critical molecular mechanism behind autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and psoriasis.

Inflammation in the brain linked to several forms of dementia
Inflammation in the brain may be more widely implicated in dementias than was previously thought, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge.

Social isolation could cause physical inflammation
Social isolation could be associated with increased inflammation in the body new research from the University of Surrey and Brunel University London has found.

Hydrogels control inflammation to help healing
Researchers test a sampling of synthetic, biocompatible hydrogels to see how tuning them influences the body's inflammatory response.

Why beta-blockers cause skin inflammation
Beta-blockers are often used to treat high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases.

The 'inflammation' of opioid use
New research correlates inflammation in the brain and gut to negative emotional state during opioid withdrawal.

Using a common anticonvulsant to counteract inflammation
The interaction between a chromosomal protein called HMGB1 and a cellular receptor called RAGE is known to trigger inflammation.

Read More: Inflammation News and Inflammation Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.