Who's available to help in times of crisis and disaster?

October 27, 2005

BURLINGTON, Vt. - Oct. 27, 2005 - New research by disaster researcher Alice Fothergill, Ph.D., and the Office of Nursing Workforce at the University of Vermont , attempts to answer the question of whether inactive nurses can and are willing to be mobilized in emergency situations. A recent survey of nurses with lapsed or inactive licenses in Vermont reveals that 27% of respondents would be willing to volunteer in a disaster. The number potential volunteers is expected to grow in the next decade when 1/3 of the 2.7 million RNs in the US retire and might be available to be called upon in times of disaster. In our post-9/11 climate communities across the US are working on their emergency preparedness and these findings suggest ways to mobilize this untapped resource.
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To reach a member of the research team for questions or interviews, please contact Alice Fothergill at (802) 656-2127 or alice.fothergill@uvm.edu, or Mary Val Palumbo at (802) 656-0025 or mpalumbo@uvm.edu.

This study is published in Public Health Nursing. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact medicalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

About the Journal
Public Health Nursing publishes thought-provoking theoretical discussions, timely reviews, dynamic clinical reports, and commentary by the nation's health care leaders. This bi-monthly publication focuses and places in context the rapidly changing issues which concern public health professionals as they manage today's system and invent the next decade's. The Journal's highly respected contributors provide a vehicle for remaining on the cutting edge of current thinking and research in the field.

About Blackwell Publishing
Blackwell Publishing is the world's leading society publisher, partnering with more than 600 academic and professional societies. Blackwell publishes over 750 journals annually and, to date has published close to 6,000 text and reference books, across a wide range of academic, medical, and professional subjects.

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