How-to book published on laser beam-shaping applications

October 27, 2005

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- Following up on their well-received first book, Laser Beam Shaping: Theory and Techniques, Sandia National Laboratories researchers Fred Dickey and Scott Holswade have edited (with David Shealy of the University of Alabama at Birmingham) a compact new volume, Laser Beam Shaping Applications.

The attractively packaged, 357-page volume offers readers the thoughts of 19 prominent practitioners who share their in-depth knowledge of how to shape laser beams to optimize their utility and improve their future development.

Contributors hail from sites as diverse as Moscow, Pretoria, Rochester, and Albuquerque.

In nine illustrated chapters, the authors -- leaders in their respective specialties -- discuss how to improve illuminators for microlithography, array-type laser printing systems, and excimer laser image systems, as well as optical data storage, isotope separation, shaping via flexible mirrors, and spectral control of spatially dispersive lasers. There is also a review of the modern field of beam-shaping.

The final chapter contains a history of beam shaping that began thousands of years ago with Assyrians in northern Iraq who had developed "a small oval, polished rock crystal in the shape of a plano-convex lens about one-quarter inch thick." The chapter also discusses the contributions of Archimedes, who is said to have arranged parabolic mirrors that would quickly sink wooden ships by burning holes in them.

Extensive references offer opportunities for more in-depth study.

The book, published by the Taylor & Francis Group, is 102nd in its optical science and engineering titles.

Recognizing the remarkable lack of acknowledgments to engineers in the modern world (despite the fact that their achievements are everywhere), the authors dedicate their second volume "to the many unrecognized researchers who developed key methods and applications of beam shaping. They innovated quietly to maintain legitimate corporate advantage, so their names are largely unknown."

The book, published in August and first displayed at the August 2000 SPIE Annual Meeting in San Diego, retails for $180. Orders may be e-mailed to orders@taylorandfrancis.com.

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. With main facilities in Albuquerque, N.M., and Livermore, Calif., Sandia has major R&D responsibilities in national security, energy and environmental technologies, and economic competitiveness.
-end-
Release is available at http://www.sandia.gov/news-center/news-releases/2005/optics-lasers/laserbeam-shaping.html

Neal Singer, nsinger@sandia.gov, (505) 845-7078

Sandia National Laboratories' World Wide Web home page is located at http://www.sandia.gov. Sandia news releases, news tips, science photo gallery, and periodicals can be found at the News Center button.

DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Related Sandia Articles from Brightsurf:

Sandia light mixer generates 11 colors simultaneously
A multicolor laser pointer you can use to change the color of the laser with a button click -- similar to a multicolor ballpoint pen -- is one step closer to reality thanks to a new tiny synthetic material made at Sandia National Laboratories.

Aerospace test at Sandia goes green with alternative to explosives
Sandia National Laboratories has successfully demonstrated a new, more environmentally friendly method to test a rocket part to ensure its avionics can withstand the shock from stage separation during flight.

Predicting the limits of friction: Sandia looks at properties of material
Sandia National Laboratories materials scientists have developed a model to predict the limits of friction behavior of metals based on materials properties -- how hard you can push on materials or how much current you can put through them before they stop working properly.

Dan Sinars represents Sandia in first energy leadership class
Dan Sinars, a senior manager in Sandia National Laboratories' pulsed power center, which built and operates the Z facility, is the sole representative from a nuclear weapons lab in a Department of Energy leadership program that recently visited Sandia.

Origin of spooky meteor noises reappraised by Sandia researchers
Sound travels more slowly than light. Then why does the sound of a meteor entering Earth's atmosphere appear simultaneously, or even prior, to the sight of the meteor itself?

Sandia adds augmented reality to training toolbox
Sandia National Laboratories computer scientists have recently adapted augmented reality to enhance training of nuclear power reactor security personnel around the world.

Sandia's solar glitter closer to market with new licensing agreement
An Albuquerque company founded by a Sandia National Laboratories scientist-turned-entrepreneur has received a license for a 'home-grown' technology that could revolutionize the way solar energy is collected and used.

Fuel cell membrane patented by Sandia outperforms market
Industrial interest is expected in a vehicular fuel cell membrane able to excrete protons at the most effective temperature ranges, allowing electrons to form an unimpeded electric current.

New Mexico African-American Affairs office honors 2 from Sandia
Two Sandia National Laboratories employees have been named recipients of 2016 Outstanding Service Awards from the New Mexico Office of African-American Affairs.

Cold War Warriors: Sandia's decades in nuclear weapons
Sandia National Laboratories has produced a video about the people behind Sandia's decades of above-ground and underground nuclear weapons testing.

Read More: Sandia News and Sandia Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.