Jefferson doctor receives Tree of Life award

October 27, 2008

PHILADELPHIA - Edith P. Mitchell, M.D., clinical professor, Department of Medical Oncology at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and associate director of Diversity Programs for the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson, was recently honored with a 'Tree of Life' award from The Wellness of You, a local nonprofit health education and resource organization.

The Tree of Life award recognizes health professionals who are committed to making a difference in community health. Recipients of this coveted award have made extraordinary contributions to health management in both the local and global community. Recipients include educators, physicians, authors, community activists, and masters of various disciplines such as martial arts and feng shui.

"I am honored to accept this award from The Wellness of You organization whose purpose is to help individuals in medically underserved areas realize that simple changes in lifestyle can have a dramatic impact on one's health," said Dr. Mitchell. "Their mission matches my own in regards to the importance of community outreach especially to those individuals who may not have the means to seek out more conventional medical advice."

Dr. Mitchell received a bachelor of science in Biochemistry "with distinction" from Tennessee State University and her medical degree from the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond. In 1973, while attending medical school, Dr. Mitchell entered the Air Force and received a commission through the Health Professions Scholarship Program. She entered active duty after completion of her internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Meharry Medical College and a fellowship in Medical Oncology at Georgetown University.

Dr. Mitchell's research in pancreatic cancer and other GI malignancies involves new drug evaluation and chemotherapy, development of new therapeutic regimens, chemoradiation strategies for combined modality therapy, patient selection criteria and supportive care for patients with gastrointestinal cancer. She travels nationally and internationally teaching and lecturing on the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies.

Dr. Mitchell has authored and co-authored more than 100 articles, book chapters, and abstracts on cancer treatment, prevention, and cancer control. As a distinguished researcher, she has received 21 Cancer Research and Principal Investigator Awards, and serves on the National Cancer Institute Review Panel and the Cancer Investigations Review Committee.

In addition to her medical achievements, Dr. Mitchell is a retired Brigadier General having served as the Air National Guard Assistant to the Command Surgeon for US Transportation command and headquarters Air Mobility Command (AMC) based at the Scott Air Force Base in Illinois. In this capacity she served as the senior medical Air National Guard advisor to the command surgeon and was the medical liaison between the active Air Force and the Air National Guard. Her responsibilities in this role included ensuring maximum wartime readiness and combat support capability of the worldwide patient movement and aero medical evacuation system, the Global Patient Movement Requirements Center and AMC's 52 Air National Guard medical squadrons.

General Mitchell has been awarded over 15 military service medals and ribbons including the Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal, Air Force Achievement and Commendation Medals, National Defense Service Medal, and Humanitarian Service Medal. Dr. Mitchell was selected for inclusion in America's Top Oncologists. Dr. Mitchell is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Medical Association, the National Medical Association, Aerospace Medical Association, Association of Military Surgeons, and the Medical Society of Eastern Pennsylvania. She is also a member of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, and the Philadelphia Society of Medicine.
-end-


Thomas Jefferson University

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