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Breakthrough in treatment for E. coli toxin

October 27, 2008

A University of Alberta researcher has found a possible treatment for the E.coli strain that killed seven people in Walkerton, Ontario, in 2000 and has just been linked to more than 200 illnesses in North Bay, Ontario.

David Bundle, chemistry professor and director of the Alberta Ingenuity Centre for Carbohydrate Science, has developed a polymeric drug that binds a naturally-occurring protein in the body with the E.coli toxin, preventing it from affecting the kidneys. The effect of E.coli 0157.H7 on the kidneys can be life-threatening.
-end-
Bundle's research into the E.coli treatment will be published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. His availability is as follows:

Tuesday, Oct. 28: 8:30:15 am MST and 3 p.m. MST
Wednesday, Oct. 29: Not available between 3:30 p.m.:30 p.m.

University of Alberta

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