Endowment fund to support ICT research

October 27, 2009

An initial round of grants from the rejuvenated Science and Industry Endowment Fund will enhance Australia's world-leading research capabilities in wireless technologies and help to address the nation's need for more skilled scientists.

The Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research, Senator the Hon Kim Carr, announced on Tuesday that the Fund would receive $150 million from the proceeds of CSIRO's Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) technology licensing program.

Senator Carr announced three initial grants from the Endowment Fund: CSIRO Group Executive, Information Sciences, Dr Alex Zelinsky, said the injection of funds, would help CSIRO - in collaboration with Macquarie University and other partners - to continue world-leading research in wireless technologies.

"We are in a position to continue to deliver real benefits to Australia from research into high-speed wireless communications," Dr Zelinsky said.

Up to 70 undergraduate scholarships and honours graduate fellowships and up to 30 postgraduate scholarships and postdoctoral fellowships are to be supported.

Dr Zelinsky said this would help address the national skills shortage in key research areas including; computer science, electrical engineering, mathematical sciences and physics.

"These are the skills that contributed to the original WLAN invention and it is rewarding to see that the Endowment Fund has recognised this as an appropriate early investment," Dr Zelinsky said.

The Science and Industry Endowment Fund will provide support for individuals and organisations across the national innovation system to undertake scientific research in all disciplines for the benefit of Australia. It will also be a vehicle for donations from industry and other benefactors to support scientific research that meets the Fund's aims and principles.
-end-
Image available at:

http://www.scienceimage.csiro.au/mediarelease/mr09-197.html

Further Information:
Dr Alex Zelinsky, Group Executive, Information Sciences
Ph: 02 372 4200
E: alex.zelinsky@csiro.au

Background information available at:

http://minister.innovation.gov.au/Carr

http://www.csiro.au/news/CSIRO-honours-wireless-team.html

Media Assistance:
Jo Finlay, CSIRO ICT Centre
Mb: 0447 639688
E: joanne.finlay@csiro.au

www.csiro.au

CSIRO Australia

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