NCI awards $7.6 million to prostate cancer research collaboration

October 28, 2003

ATLANTA--Teamwork pays. A collaborative group of cancer researchers has won a $7.6 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to study the pathways and mechanism for prostate cancer metastasis to bone.

Titled "Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis: Biology and Targeting," the collaboration consists of three separate but interrelated projects. The overall project will be led by Leland Chung, PhD, director of Urological Research in Emory University's Department of Urology, and will bring together investigators from Emory's School of Medicine, Winship Cancer Institute, Departments of Urology, Pathology, Biostatistics, and School of Public Health. In addition, researchers from the University of Delaware, University of Virginia, Stanford University and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center will participate.

"The strength of this project is its interactive nature," said Dr. Chung, who is a Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Scholar. "We are all looking at different parts of the metastasis problem, and the laboratory activity is highly interactive. This project is organized to achieve synergy among individual scientists who have an established track record of research collaboration."

Nearly 90 percent of all prostate cancer patients who die from the cancer experience bone metastasis. "The ultimate goal of this project," said Dr. Chung, "is to develop novel diagnostic, prognostic and treatment options based on a better understanding of the mechanics of prostate cancer and bone metastasis."

The three primary projects are:

In addition, the grant will involve three "core groups," which will provide biostatistics, animal and tissue cultures, and pathology and laboratory support.

Dr. Chung notes that an important goal of the three collaborative projects is to discover relevant genes that may "turn on or turn off" during the making of prostate cancer cells and their subsequent metastasis to bone.

"This collaboration enables us to validate laboratory findings using animal and tissue culture models with well-documented clinical specimens," said Dr. Chung. "By embarking on this team approach to the problem of prostate cancer bone metastasis, we may discover new pathways that support the metastasis. As a result, new therapies may be generated in the diagnosis and treatment of men with advanced forms of prostate cancer."
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Emory University Health Sciences Center

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