Plenary lecturers share science and policy perspectives

October 28, 2009

MADISON, WI, OCTOBER 27, 2009 -- Worldwide leaders in agricultural research, science policy, and soil science will address emerging developments in plant and soil sciences as daily plenary lectures during the 2009 Annual Meetings of the American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), and Soil Science Society of America (SSSA), Nov. 1-5 in Pittsburgh, PA.The meeting will be held at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh, PA. The four daily plenary lecturers are:

Sunday, Nov. 1, 2009, 6:00 pm, Ballroom BC
ASA Plenary /E.T. & Vam York Distinguished Lecture
Gebisa Ejeta, Purdue University

Dr. Gebisa Ejeta is the recipient of the 2009 World Food Prize for his contributions in the production of sorghum, which have dramatically enhanced the food supply for millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa. He will present the 2009 E.T. & Vam York Distinguished ASA Plenary Lecture, "Fueling the Resurgence of Our Purpose-Driven Sciences," on Sunday, Nov. 1, from 6:00-7:00pm. His personal journey would lead him from a childhood in a one-room thatched hut in rural Ethiopia to scientific acclaim as a distinguished professor, plant breeder, and geneticist at Purdue University. Ejeta's scientific breakthroughs in breeding drought-tolerant and Striga-resistant sorghum have combined with his persistent efforts to foster economic development and the empowerment of subsistence farmers through the creation of agricultural enterprises in rural Africa.

Monday, Nov. 2, 2009, 8:00-9:30 am, Ballroom BC
ASA Plenary Lecture
Roger Beachy, USDA- National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Roger Beachy is the director of the USDA's newly established National Institute of Food and Agriculture in Washington, DC. Prior to his appointment to the Obama administration, Dr. Beachy served as the founding president of the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St. Louis, MO. He is internationally known for his groundbreaking research on development of virus-resistant plants through biotechnology. The new Institute takes the existing USDA-CSREES (Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service) and transforms it into a cross-agency "federal science enterprise," according USDA Secretary Vilsack. He will share his outlook for the new institute at the ASA Plenary Lecture on Monday, Nov.2, from 8:00-9:30 am at the Annual Meetings.

Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2009, 8:00-9:30 am, Ballroom BC
CSSA Plenary Lecture
Calestous Juma, Harvard University

Dr. Calestous Juma is a professor of the practice of international development and director of the Science, Technology, and Globalization Project at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. His research focuses on the application of science and innovation to sustainable development. Dr. Juma is a former head of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity and has been elected to several academies including the Royal Society of London, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World. He is the 2009 Betty Klepper Endowed Lecturer. His presentation, "Science and Innovation for Sustainability--Harnessing Technological Abundance," will explore the role of technological innovation in fostering the sustainability transition, with specific emphasis on agriculture. He will present the CSSA Plenary Lecture on Tuesday, Nov. 3, from 8:00-9:30 am at the Annual Meetings.

Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2009, 8:00-9:30 am, Ballroom BC
SSSA Plenary Lecture
Ian Pepper, University of Arizona

Dr. Ian Pepper is a professor in the department of Community, Environment, and Policy and the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering at the University of Arizona. He is also the director of the Environmental Research Laboratory and NSF Water Quality Center at University of Arizona. Pepper's lecture, "Soils: A Public Health Threat or Savior," will highlight the ways that soil's biodiversity and architecture has contributed to human health, nutrition, and global ecology, making it one of the most valuable ecosystems in the world. He will present the SSSA Plenary Lecture on Wednesday, Nov. 4, from 8:00-9:30 am at the Annual Meetings.
-end-
In addition to the daily plenary lecturers, more than 2,700 international scientists, professionals, educators, and students will present new technologies and discuss emerging trends in agriculture, energy, climate change, science education, and related issues as part of the ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meetings, Nov. 1-5 in Pittsburgh, PA. Follow our daily Twitter feed of research and events at: www.twitter.com/ASA_CSSA_SSSA , #ACSMtg. For meeting information, including abstracts of the papers being presented, visit: www.acsmeetings.org or contact Sara Uttech, ASA-CSSA-SSSA, 608-268-4948, suttech@agronomy.org

Complimentary registration to this event is offered to credentialed journalists, Public Information Officers, and NASW members. Advance registration is encouraged, by sending a request to Sara Uttech, Science Communications Manager, suttech@agronomy.org, 608-268-4948. To register on-site, present a business card or other credentials to the Newsroom, Room 310, David L. Lawrence Convention Center.

Can't make it to the meeting? ASA-CSSA-SSSA will post news releases to the Annual Meetings online newsroom at: www.acsmeetings.org/newsroom. Power Point presentations will also be available for many papers; please contact Sara Uttech: suttech@agronomy.org for more information.

The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) www.agronomy.org, is a scientific society helping its 8,000+ members advance the disciplines and practices of agronomy by supporting professional growth and science policy initiatives, and by providing quality, research-based publications and a variety of member services.

American Society of Agronomy

Related Agricultural Articles from Brightsurf:

Researchers map genomes of agricultural monsters
The University of Cincinnati is unlocking the genomes of creepy agricultural pests like screwworms that feast on livestock from the inside out and thrips that transmit viruses to plants.

Genomes published for major agricultural weeds
Representing some of the most troublesome agricultural weeds, waterhemp, smooth pigweed, and Palmer amaranth impact crop production systems across the US and elsewhere with ripple effects felt by economies worldwide.

Tennessee agricultural sectors taking a hit from COVID-19
The latest research from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture indicates that the COVID-19 pandemic has affected all aspects of agricultural commodity production and distribution, leading to substantial price declines and reduced income for farmers.

Agricultural pickers in US to see unsafely hot workdays double by 2050
Temperature increases by 2050 and 2100 in U.S. counties where crops are grown will double, then triple the number of unsafe workdays.

Digital agriculture paves the road to agricultural sustainability
In a study published in Nature Sustainability, researchers outline how to develop a more sustainable land management system through data collection and stakeholder buy-in.

Significant potential demonstrated by digital agricultural advice
2019 Economics Nobel Laureate co-publishes paper demonstrating the potential for digital agricultural advice to 'sustainably' raise 'agricultural productivity' at low cost for 2 billion smallholder farming families.

Sustaining roads with grape and agricultural waste
The US spends $5 billion a year to repair damages to road infrastructure from winter snow and ice control operations and the use of traditional deicers.

New report says accelerating global agricultural productivity growth is critical
The 2019 Global Agricultural Productivity Report, released today by Virginia Tech's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, shows agricultural productivity growth -- increasing output of crops and livestock with existing or fewer inputs -- is growing globally at an average annual rate of 1.63%.

The benefits of updating agricultural drainage infrastructure
The massive underground infrastructure that allows farmers to cultivate crops on much of the world's most productive land has outlived its design life and should be updated, according to a new study.

The next agricultural revolution is here
By using modern gene-editing technologies to learn key insights about past agricultural revolutions, two plant scientists are suggesting that the next agricultural revolution could be at hand.

Read More: Agricultural News and Agricultural Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.