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PIDS supports IDSA statement on involuntary quarantine of healthcare workers returning from Ebola-affected countries

October 28, 2014

ARLINGTON, VA. (October 28) - The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS) endorses Statement from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) regarding involuntary quarantine of healthcare workers returning from Ebola-affected countries. PIDS is the world's largest organization of professionals dedicated to the treatment, control and eradication of infectious diseases affecting children. PIDS agrees that strategies to limit Ebola Virus disease transmission should be based on the best available medical, scientific, and epidemiological evidence, as stated by IDSA. Furthermore, PIDS supports the policies promoted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health to end the Ebola outbreak without further losses.
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PIDS membership encompasses leaders across the global scientific and public health spectrum, including clinical care, advocacy, academics, government, and the pharmaceutical industry. From fellowship training to continuing medical education, research, regulatory issues and guideline development, PIDS members are the core professionals advocating for the improved health of children with infectious diseases both nationally and around the world, participating in critical public health and medical professional advisory committees that determine the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases, immunization practices in children, and the education of pediatricians. For more information, visit http://www.pids.org.

Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

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