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Is prolactin inducible protein (PIP) protective against breast cancer?

October 28, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, October 28, 2016--Researchers describe the first evidence linking prolactin inducible protein (PIP) to the immune system's ability to recognize and destroy foreign cells, such as tumor cells. New research in PIP-deficient mice that demonstrates the role of PIP in cell-mediated immunity and suggests that this immune regulatory function may be protective against breast cancer is presented in DNA and Cell Biology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the DNA and Cell Biology website until November 18, 2016.

Coauthors Olivia Ihedioha, Robert Shiu, Jude Uzonna, and Yvonne Myal, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, describe the potential clinical implications of these findings, in which PIP could represent an effective new target for the development of novel immunotherapeutic agents. The researchers review their recent studies of PIP, known as a biomarker of mammary differentiation, in the article entitled "Prolactin-Inducible Protein: From Breast Cancer Biomarker to Immune Modulator--Novel Insights from Knockout Mice."

"Breast cancers are among the most common tumors. PIP was observed to be selectively expressed by these cells," says Carol Shoshkes Reiss, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of DNA and Cell Biology and Professor, Departments of Biology and Neural Science, and Global Public Health at New York University, NY. "The work from the Myal lab in this paper is exciting because of the immunoregulatory activity they describe. I hope it will lead to novel therapeutic approaches to this devastating disease."
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About the Journal

DNA and Cell Biology is the trusted source for authoritative, peer-reviewed reporting on the latest research in the field of molecular biology. By combining mechanistic and clinical studies from multiple systems in a single journal, DNA and Cell Biology facilitates communication among biological sub-disciplines. Coverage includes gene structure, function, and regulation, molecular medicine, cellular organelles, protein biosynthesis and degradation, and cell-autonomous inflammation and host cell response to infection. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the DNA and Cell Biology website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Human Gene Therapy, Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, and AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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