Similarities in imaging the human body, Earth's crust focus of conference at UH

October 29, 2008

HOUSTON, Oct. 29, 2008 - Whether it's in the human body or under the Earth's crust, modeling the unseen involves many similar techniques. Physicians and geologists will be meeting at the University of Houston to discuss just how much they have in common.

Through a partnership between UH, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) and Apache Corporation, experts in biomedical and seismic imaging will gather to explore the potential for cross-collaboration in imaging. The UH Imaging Symposium will be sponsored by Apache Corp., an oil and gas exploration company. It will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 6 at UH in the Rockwell Pavilion of the M.D. Anderson Library. The event is free and open to the public.

The symposium will feature lectures by 16 leading experts from UH and MDACC, as well as industry leaders in the areas of oil and gas exploration and geophysics. This event will provide a platform for representatives from different disciplines to discuss shared challenges and offer novel theories to their peers for addressing them. The symposium's goal is to identify opportunities for cross-fertilization of ideas between biomedical and seismic imaging, resulting in new theories and paradigms to share among all imaging professionals, regardless of the field.

Six UH faculty and three MDACC researchers will deliver lectures during the conference. Joining them in the list of presentations will be various experts from Apache Corp., ExxonMobil Corp., Paradigm Geophysical, St. Luke's Health Care System, TGS-NOPEC Geophysical Co. and Schlumberger/WesternGeco. While the symposium's lectures will be technical in nature, the audience is expected to consist of a wide-ranging cross section of faculty, professionals and students in the areas of geology, geophysics, engineering, medicine and health. Topics to be addressed include everything from visualizing blood flow and cell imaging to well performance and how seismic imaging is used to view the Earth's center.

For more information or to RSVP, contact Brian Shaw at bmshaw@central.uh.edu or 713-743-8481.

WHAT: University of Houston Imaging Symposium

WHEN: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 6

WHERE: University of Houston, Rockwell Pavilion of the M.D. Anderson Library, Entrance 1 off Calhoun Road
http://www.uh.edu/campus_map/buildings/L.php

WHO: Physicians and geologists with expertise in biomedical and seismic imaging
-end-
For more information about UH, visit the university's Newsroom at http://www.uh.edu/news-events/.

To receive UH science news via e-mail, visit http://www.uh.edu/news-events/mailing-lists/sciencelistserv.php.

University of Houston

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