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A potential targets for the prevention or treatment of esophageal carcinoma

October 29, 2008

Expression of Livin in fresh esophageal cancer tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC), Western blotting and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), VEGF by Its correlation Western blotting and RT-PCR. Livin positivity was also significantly correlated with tumor stages, increasing with tumor progression. Expression of Livin and VEGF increased with the process of esophageal carcinoma. In the fourth clinical stage, expression of Livin and VEGF was the most significant. Expression of Livin was positive correlation with VEGF. Over-expression of Livin and VEGF contributes to the pathogenesis of esophageal carcinoma.

A research article to be published on October 7, 2008 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. The research team led by Professor

Ren GS Cancer Institute of Chiongqing Medical University used molecular biology technology to investigate the role of Livin and VEGF in human esophageal carcinoma and analyze its relationship with clinical stages.

In the present study, authors investigated expression of Livin in human esophageal carcinoma and analyze its relationship with clinical stages. The results showed that Livin positivity was also significantly correlated with tumor stages, increasing with tumor progression. Expression of Livin increased with the process of esophageal carcinoma. In the fourth clinical stage, expression of Livin was the most significant. The results showed that VEGF positivity was also significantly correlated with tumor stages, increasing with tumor progression. Expression of VEGF increased with the process of esophageal carcinoma. In the fourth clinical stage, expression of VEGF was the most significant.

Taken together, over-expression of Livin and VEGF contributes to the pathogenesis of esophageal carcinoma. Level of VEGF has positive correlation with Livin. The hypothesis has been made that Livin and VEGF played such an inter-enhancement role in the progress of esophageal carcinoma. Inhibitors of Livin and VEGF may be potential targets for the prevention or treatment of human esophageal carcinoma.
-end-
Reference

Chen L, Ren GS, Li F, Sun SQ. Expression of Livin and vascular endothelial growth factor in different clinical stages of human esophageal carcinoma. World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14(37): 5749-5754
http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/14/5749.asp

Correspondence to: Guo-Sheng Ren, Department of Thorax, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University,Chongqing 400016, China. renguosheng726@163.com Telephone: +86-23-89012301 Fax: +86-23-68120808

About World Journal of Gastroenterology

World Journal of Gastroenterology (WJG), a leading international journal in gastroenterology and hepatology, has established a reputation for publishing first class research on esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, viral hepatitis, colorectal cancer, and H pylori infection and provides a forum for both clinicians and scientists. WJG has been indexed and abstracted in Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, Science Citation Index Expanded (also known as SciSearch) and Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Index Medicus, MEDLINE and PubMed, Chemical Abstracts, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Abstracts Journals, Nature Clinical Practice Gastroenterology and Hepatology, CAB Abstracts and Global Health. ISI JCR 2003-2000 IF: 3.318, 2.532, 1.445 and 0.993. WJG is a weekly journal published by WJG Press. The publication dates are the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day of every month. WJG is supported by The National Natural Science Foundation of China, No. 30224801 and No. 30424812, and was founded with the name of China National Journal of New Gastroenterology on October 1, 1995, and renamed WJG on January 25, 1998.

About The WJG Press


The WJG Press mainly publishes World Journal of Gastroenterology.

World Journal of Gastroenterology

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