Handbook helps parents deal with childhood infections

October 30, 2007

A new book designed for parents helps them better understand the diseases their children could face and the weapons to fight them, while offering practical advice for preventing infections in their kids without going overboard.

Germ Proof Your Kids: The Complete Guide to Protecting (without Overprotecting) Your Family from Infections, released this week by ASM Press, is the inside source on germ defense - from antibiotics and vaccines to health foods and home remedies. Written by internationally respected pediatrician and infectious disease specialist Dr. Harley Rotbart, the book offers an accessible, comprehensive handbook for parents and physicians.

"Parents feel incredible anxiety about their children contracting nasty germs and untreatable diseases. News sources are increasingly filled with stories of contaminated hamburger, Bird flu, common colds, and the West Nile virus. In a world seemingly full of microscopic danger, where can concerned parents turn to protect their kids" Germ Proof Your Kids guides them in protecting, without overprotecting, the ones they love from the invisible enemies all around them," says Rotbart, who is Professor and Vice Chairman of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of Denver.

By combining the latest scientific findings on disease prevention and treatment with the ages-old wisdom of Mom and Grandma, Rotbart demystifies childhood infections in four parts: While written for parents, this volume also serves as a perfect office manual for physicians, providing the up-to-date, concise information that doctors need to educate parents about germs and the best available treatment options.
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More information on the book, including Rotbart's GERMBlog™, can be found online at www.germproofyourkids.com.

Germ Proof Your Kids has a list price of $29.95 and can be purchased through ASM Press online at http://estore.asm.org or through other online retailers.

ASM Press is the book publishing arm of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), the oldest and largest single life science membership organization in the world. The ASM's mission is to promote research in the microbiological sciences and to assist communication between scientists, policy makers, and the public to improve health and foster economic well-being.

American Society for Microbiology

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